What do the CFL and Quebec have in common?

Both have unique rules, the CFL unique to American football and Quebec unique to the rest of Canada, to ensure themselves a distinct status and reason for existence, and both get kicked around a lot. :lol:

Just tryin to lighten things up around here, this US expansion talk is getting a bit serious I think.

Montreal

Hey, a lot of things wouldn't survive if it weren't for Canadian gov't bail out money. But I thought free trade was supposed to take care of that. :wink:

Whatever... they tariffed our softwood because they thought it would distroy their local industry we need to tariff the heck out of the NFL, aperently that's alowed in free trade

Yes Mr. Goodell, you can put a team in Toronto however 1/4 of the profits must go directly to the CFL coffers. Sound ok? :wink:

I like it!

Yes it was Earl, but as I have tried to explain many times in the past, whether it's sports or politics or business...etc. Any trade agreements or treaties or contracts of any kind designed and drwan up by AMERICA only benefit one country....AMERICA!

And...regarding your comment about the CFL being unique to american football??? You have that backwards I think. Since the CFL and 3-down football is older,then the nfl is unique to Canadian Football. No??

Yes, football as we know it, developed first in Canada and was exported to the US. We did absorb alot of superficial things from US football (such as position and play names) during the '50s due to the large amount of US players coming up here to play (they made more money than in the NFL, true fact, until the AFL was formed and gave the NFL some compitition, the NFL paid their players sh*t).
We can truly say that the North American style of football was born in Canada and exported to the US.

True enough geo and StampsRock about our uniqueness as you say, we were first. Just saying unique in terms of numbers of North Americans, including many Canadians I think, that follow football and who are ignorant of history who would say that our game is unique, that's all.

Football was introduced to North America in Canada, by the British Army garrison in Montreal, which played a series of games with McGill University. In 1874, McGill invited Harvard to Montreal to play their new game derived from Rugby football in a home and home series. Many of the similarities and differences between the Canadian and American games indeed came out of this original home and home series where each home team set the rules. For instance, Harvard due to lack of campus space did not have a full-sized rugby pitch. Their pitch was only 100 yards long x 50 yards wide with undersized endzones (still the regulation size for American Football). Because of the reduced field, the Harvard team opted for 11 players per side, four less than the regulation 15 of Rugby Union (13 in Rugby League). The number of downs was also increased by Harvard to 4 from 3 set by McGill to generate more offence. Both the Canadian and American games still have some things in common with the two varieties of rugby, especially rugby league, and, because of the similarities, the National Football League has established a formal relationship with the Canadian Football League.

Many, perhaps most, of the rules differences have arisen because of rules changes in American football in the early twentieth century which have not been copied by Canadian football. The major Canadian codes never abolished the onside scrimmage kick (see Kicker advancing the ball below) or restricted backfield motion, while the NCAA (from whose code all American codes derive) did. Canadian football was late in adopting the hand snap and the forward pass, although one would not suspect the latter from play today. Additionally, Canadian football was slower in removing restrictions on blocking, but caught up by the 1970s so that no significant differences remain today. Similarly, differences in scoring (the Canadian game valuing touchdowns less) opened up from the late 19th century but were erased by the 1950s. For these reasons, this article would have been considerably longer during about 1910-50. An area in which American football has been more conservative is the retention of the fair catch (see below).

In some regions along the Canada-USA border, especially western areas, some high schools from opposite sides of the border will regularly play games against one another (typically one or two per team per season). By agreement between the governing bodies involved, the field of the home team is considered a legal field, although it is a different size from one school's normal field. In all but a few cases, the rules of the home team are followed throughout the game.

Because of the similarities between the two games, many outside of Canada today consider Canadian football a minor variation of the American game and the CFL to be a minor league (which is a misconception) and not a major professional league. Indeed, many Canadian Football League players are Americans who grew up playing American football. CFL games are even broadcast in the United States on regional cable sports networks covering large portions of the US, though media coverage is generally of a much lower level than that of the NFL.

However, the CFL is popular in Canada per an Association for Canadian Studies survey (PDF file). Another survey found that the CFL was the second most popular league in Canada, after the NHL, and before the NFL.[1]

For individuals who played both American and Canadian football professionally, their career statistic totals are considered to be their combined totals from their careers in both the CFL and NFL. Warren Moon, for example, was the all-time professional football leader in passing yards after an illustrious career in both leagues. He was surpassed in 2006 by Damon Allen, whose career has been exclusively in the CFL.

Wow BeerBarons! Way to copy and paste information from Wikipedia without sourcing or referencing it. Ever heard of plagiarism?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_Canadian_and_American_football

Earl, you are beyond the scope of human understanding. I'm worried about your inferiority complex enough to suggest that you seek therapy. If you handle your personal relationships this way I guarantee that you will spend your life without any close or meaningful contact. Take a long look in the mirror.

This is a fan forum which we share information for fun nor did I claim to have wrote that.
Do you count each blade of grass on your lawn too?

Yes, 211,295,311.5 blades of grass (one was broken in half).

Anyway I was mostly joking about the plagiarism comment. As a general rule of principle though you should usually post a link or give credit to the site/author you are quoting, even if it is obvious you did not write it.

Or sometimes even better in the case of really long articles like your previous one, it can be more appropriate to post a link rather than having a post which takes up half of the page.

I'm not trying to be hard on you BeerBarons. I'm actually glad to have you as part of the community here. I just sometimes get carried away. I look forward to future discussions with you. :thup:

billybimbo wrote:

Earl, you are beyond the scope of human understanding. I'm worried about your inferiority complex enough to suggest that you seek therapy. If you handle your personal relationships this way I guarantee that you will spend your life without any close or meaningful contact. Take a long look in the mirror.

Hey bimbo, do you know what "read between the lines" means? :smiley:

Agreed with BD, BeerBelly.....protocol is to generally share a link.....

HEY!!!!! WHAT MAKES YOU THINK THAT I DID NOT WRITE THAT FOR WIKIPEDIA!!!!

LOL ok I am only joking.

I also agree with BD, usually I do share the link sorce but it was 3 am here when I posted that. I was tired.
I knew you were just kidding around BD, I have a warped sence of wit too.

ready...
ok here it is....

For the record, that post was from Widipedia.
I copied and pasted it.
There is everyone happy now,lol

True...good point

ME! :rockin:

Hee!Hee! Good one ro! My new wife is from Quebec so I gotta be careful here!! My french isn't too good even after a couple beers but you gotta love a province where you can walk into the small corner store almost anywhere and buy cold king cans of beer!! I live close to the border so I have experience in these matters! :thup: :rockin: