Tiger cat great Ralph Goldston passes away

The story can be found on the TSN site....

http://www.tsn.ca/cfl/story/?id=371600
8) Sad to hear of the passing of Ralph Goldston. Ralph was one of the all time tough guys from that great era of real
   hard nosed TiCat defences.

   He played the game hard and rough and wouldn't take any guff from any opponent at all.

   If it meant taking a rough play penalty, he didn't care as long as he made his point, and that opposing player never
   tried any nonsence with him again.

    A real nice guy off the field, but mean as hell on it.

    Anytime the Cats would bring in some new hot shot player on offence, Ralph would be sure to test him out, just to see
    how tough he really was, and not too many of them passed the Goldston test !!

     Wish we had some players like him today with the Cats.

      RIP  Goldie  and condolences to your family.

Another great job by TSN to bring to light this type of information. Well done. :thup:

From wikipedia:

Goldston finished his career with the Montreal Alouettes in 1965.

Date of birth:
February 25, 1929 (age 82)

Place of birth:
Campbell, Ohio

Career information
Position(s):
Running back
Defensive back

Height:
5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)

Weight:
195 lb (88 kg)

College:
Youngstown State (Ron Jaworski, Jim Tressel football coach and AD 1985-2000, Tiger cat RB John Kinch)
Indiana University

NFL Draft:
1952 / Round: 11 / Pick: 125 overall by Philadelphia Eagles

Organizations
As player:

1952-1955 Philadelphia Eagles
1956-1964 Hamilton Tiger-Cats
1965 Montreal Alouettes

Ralph Peter Goldston was a running back and defensive back in the Canadian Football League who played nine seasons for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. He helped the Tiger-Cats to two Grey Cup wins in 1957 and 1963. Goldston finished his career with the Montreal Alouettes in 1965. He was selected in the 1952 NFL Draft by the Philadelphia Eagles and he played four seasons for the Eagles. Goldston passed away July 9, 2011 in Columbus, OH

1952 NFL age 23
Rushing
65 ATT 210 YDS 3.2 AVG 3 TD 20 LNG

1954 NFL age 25
0 ATT 0 YDS 0 AVG 0 TD 0 LNG

1955 NFL age 26
14 ATT -7 YDS -0.5 AVG 0 TD 7 LNG

His CFL stats are available at:

http://www.cflapedia.com/Players/g/goldston_ralph.htm

Thank you for the stories Tipper. I never got to see him play, but the name I’ve heard many times along with other Tiger cat greats of that time…

Date of birth:

February 25, 1929 (age 82)

Place of birth:

Campbell, Ohio

Career information

Position(s):

Running back
Defensive back

Height:

5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)

Weight:

195 lb (88 kg)

College:

Youngstown State

NFL Draft:

1952 / Round: 11 / Pick: 125

Organizations

As player:

1952-1955
1956-1964
1965

Philadelphia Eagles
Hamilton Tiger-Cats
Montreal Alouettes

Playing stats at DatabaseFootball.com

Ralph Peter Goldston was a running back and defensive back in the Canadian Football League who played nine seasons for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. He helped the Tiger-Cats to two Grey Cup wins in 1957 and 1963. Goldston finished his career with the Montreal Alouettes in 1965. He was selected in the 1952 NFL Draft by the Philadelphia Eagles and he played four seasons for the Eagles. Goldston passed away July 9, 2011 in Columbus, OH

[edit] External links
Bio

Ralph Goldston had no idea he was a pioneer when he reported to the Eagles’ training camp in 1952. He was only concerned with one thing and that was making the team. He didn’t realize he made history just by walking through the door.

Goldston, who died July 9 at age 82, and fellow rookie Don Stevens were the first African-Americans to wear an Eagles uniform. Goldston was an 11th-round draft pick, a halfback from Youngstown State. Stevens, also a halfback, was a 30th-round pick from Illinois.

“I didn’t know about any color line,? Goldston said in 2005 interview. “I didn’t find out that I was the first (black player) until I was there for awhile. It wasn’t a big deal. Don and I were treated the same as the other rookies.?

In 1952, the Eagles were coming off two poor seasons and Steve Van Buren, their great halfback, was at the end of his career. The team was looking for speed in the backfield so it drafted both Goldston and Stevens.

Actually, the Eagles’ first draft pick that year was Johnny Bright, an African-American halfback from Drake, but Bright signed with Calgary in the Canadian Football League. He later said he went to the CFL because he did not want to be the first black player on the Eagles. He thought there would be too much pressure.

Goldston, a native of Campbell, Ohio, had no such fears.

“I didn’t know the history,? he said. “I felt if the Eagles drafted me, there wasn’t a problem. Other (black) players were doing well in pro football. What (Bright) was thinking, I can’t say. I was just grateful for the opportunity. It worked out well for me.?

In Philadelphia, Goldston lived with a minister and his wife at 24th and Montgomery in North Philadelphia. He walked to and from practice at Shibe Park, 21st and Lehigh. As a rookie, he cracked the starting lineup and led the team with three rushing touchdowns. He also saw action on defense.

Hugh Brown of the Philadelphia Bulletin described the 5-11, 195-pound Golston as “a powerful and shifty runner (who is) in the opinion of many, the best all-around back in camp.?

Reporters covering the team made occasional references to race, such as a Philadelphia Inquirer story on Goldston that predicted “a great year for the hard-hitting Negro.? But there was no mention of the fact that Goldston and Stevens were the first black players in the team’s 20-year history.

“The way we fit in, I guess no one thought twice about it,? Goldston said.

According to Goldston, it was only an issue when the team traveled. In several cities, he said, he and Stevens were forced to stay in a different hotel. He said the arrangement had its advantages. “All it meant,? he said, “was Don and I didn’t have a curfew.?

A broken leg suffered in the 1953 exhibition season sidelined Goldston for the entire year. He came back the next season and was switched to defense where he played two more years. In 1956, he signed with Hamilton in the Canadian Football League. He played 10 seasons in the CFL and helped Hamilton win two Grey Cups (1957 and ’63).

After retiring as an active player, Goldston spent 30 years as a college coach (Harvard and Colorado) and finally a scout for the Seattle Seahawks.

He will be buried Saturday in Youngstown. He is survived by his wife, Sarah, one son, Ralph, Jr., three daughters, Ursula, Beverly and Monique and five grandchildren

Another sad milestone as an old great passes away.

I knew Ralph Jr when we were both teens...anyone know what he's doing?