Pyramiding rule

Quite possibly a very different interpretation of reality

Alternative facks

1 Like

Although I was only half serious but when you think about it, the rule has been on the books for decades so what else has changed now? It may not be the most likely reason but it is a possibility and the only one I can think of. Anybody got a better theory so they can join my conspiracy theory thinking?

Join the local high school football referee association and we'll see if you can do better.

The speed at the pro level makes it tough

You have to wonder what the league is thinking .

Someone in a meeting or in a memo said look out for this and they are now finding offences thru marginal technicalities where they did not exist before .

Now you get way less entertainment but a great social experiment in reffing by the letter of the wording in a rule book versus the actual intent of the rule .

CFL is not interested in actual sports entertainment to sell they are selling the fan total structural rules enforcement thinking the fan in the stand really cares about a tug , a push , a fart , a pinkie finger over the line .

They actually think the Fan cares about non consequential offences and border line offences at home or in the stands .

IMO

If it's not OVERT attempt to gain a substantial advantage don't call it ; if it's not a penalty that could lead to an injury do not call it . If it had nothing to do with the play and is non consequence ; pick up the flag or better yet don't throw it .

1 Like

I will be not available for a while, EZ just made a post I agree with so I am naturally quite worried for my well being and am checking into a hospital to get fully checked over

2 Likes

Hmmm, I had that very thought.....
Then I checked my calendar, it turns out it's just opposite day today.

Go Riders Go? :upside_down_face:

2 Likes

Like in last nights game, the Elks player was pushing THROUGH the 2 defenders (head shake!!!!)......

I didn’t see it. How are your vitals?

Article 5 – Pyramiding
Using the body of another player or the goal post assembly in any way to gain or
maintain elevation or jump over the line in an attempt to block a field goal or a
convert attempt.
PENALTY: L10

Last night - the player didn't do that. he jumped yes, but he put his hands on the back of the players on either side of him, yes, as he was coming down. He quite clearly did not gain or maintain elevation as it was a single leap not aided by pushing off the players on either side of him.

The referees called it on intent - which as far as I know isn't in any rule book because asking officials to judge intent leads down the rabbit hole to ruin.

The Hamilton player leaped by himself. The guy who threw the flag was the guy with the worst possible view of what happened.

Both were a case of a player using athletic ability. Guess we don't want that in the CFL......

2 Likes

I'm not in support of how they now interpret the age old rule today, I wonder is this what they are calling now

or jump over the line in an attempt to block a field goal

The two hands on the back to jump over the line??

Nice to see CFL referees staying current with coaching innovations in football. The 'pyramid play' used in an effort to block a place kick was created by coach Alonzo 'Lon' Stiner and first implemented by the 1933 Oregon State Agricultural College team now known as Oregon State. We all should be very wary of something new coming from someone named Alonzo. Have you ever been able to trust someone named Alonzo? I haven't.

It’s very evident that CFL pyramiding rule is arse up, face down…..

ALONZO STAGG

Mini AMOS ALONZO sub thread

I miss the good ole days …..
image

image

Now that's pyramiding at it's finest. It would seem that that is somehow what the refs this weekend were seeing in their mind's eye.

1 Like

That looks pretty bizarre. You can certainly see why the rule was invented, although I didn’t see anything remotely similar on any of the pyramiding calls of late.

I also didn’t know that Brooks Koepka once played for the Bombers.

Never heard of it. I think I saw tripping called once when I was a kid.

about intent. He was up in the air with hands on two players. Did he intend to use them to propel himself. Ref doesnt know so has to call it like it looked like. It fit the criteria for pyramiding.

Were those players pyramiding trying to block a field goal or just standing in for injured male cheerleaders?