NFL motion rules

Can anyone explain the NFL rule on pre snap motion, watching the Colts it looked as if the whole O line was moving around as well as all recievers, rb, and QB? has the NFL changed the rule?

No one may be moving towards the line of scrimage as the ball is snapped, but one person may be moving latteraly or away from the line as the ball is snapped. I'm not sure about presnap motion, but I don't think there are too many restrictions, as long as they are set by the time the ball is snapped.

Bdota is correct.

To answer Mass's question, as I commented separately as well and as you saw in the Super Bowl, there is an exception allowed to the rules restricting offensive motion in order for players to hear an audible by the quarterback in a loud stadium environment provided that those player re-set according to the rules for at least a second before the ball is snapped.

If I had my way, and borrowing in part from the CFL as I had written prior to joining this blog for the football junkie I am, I would change the existing rules on motion as follows in order to open up things more in the NFL on its smaller field:

Expansion Of Offensive Motion Before Snap

Allow Movement In Any Direction Behind The Line Of Scrimmage Of Any TWO Players In The Backfield Except
The Quarterback,
Any Players Inside Or Within Two Yards Of Tackle, And Any
Forward Motion By Any Player Between Tackles Or Behind Them (i.e. Running Or Wing Backs) Except
Existing Permitted Shifts As Allowed.

Players Shifting Or Motioning Otherwise Under Existing Rules Anywhere On Offense Count As One Of The Players For Purposes Of This Rule

For Purposes Of The Count, Both Split Or All Tri Backs (i.e. wishbone, Power I, full house) Shifting In The Backfield SIMULTANEOUSLY To Re-Set Count Only As One Player

Once A Player Has Moved In Any Way, It Counts Against The Maximum Of Only Two Permitted Offensive Players Allowed To Move Per Play, And He Cannot Be Substituted By The Movement Of Another Player Even Should He Stop

No Player May Move Forward In Motion Before The Snap In The Area Between The Imaginary Lines Extending Vertically From Two Yards Outside Of Where The Tackles Line-Up. This Restriction Should Exist Largely For Safety Reasons For Play On The Line. A Permitted Shift By Running Backs Is An Exception.

Discussion

Other than annoying stoppages of play due to non-impact penalties such as illegal motion or illegal shift, why should not the receiving game in the NFL be opened up a bit more to some degree?

Solid passing quarterbacks are already scarce enough I say, and such a change to expand offensive motion before the snap opens matters up even more for offenses even in short yardage situations when normally eight or more men on defense are stuffed "in the box" for what we see all too often as yet another dull "cloud of dust" play.

There is no discussion, it,s obvious to any one watching , that the NFL does not enforce their rule book, regarding offencive movement before the snap, and also offencive holding and procedure are also ignored, much like in the NHL where the rules are left to the discretion of the"official,s" __in comparison it seems as if the CFL is doing a good job maintaining the integrity of the sport ! :thup: :cowboy:

Here's one of only two areas for which I can see an easy improvement for the NFL for sake of the flow of the game as well as the fan experience without any known sigificant or even minor trade-offs.

Here's my latest revision when looking at this topic from months ago in the interest of opening things up in the NFL and borrowing in part from the CFL as both games have from each other since at least the 1890s:

Expansion Of Offensive Motion Before Snap In American Football

Allow Movement In Any Direction One Yard Behind The Line Of Scrimmage Of Any TWO Players In The Backfield Except

-The Quarterback Except Existing Permitted Movements
-Any Players Within Two Yards Outside Of Each Tackle
-And Any Forward Motion By Any Player Between Tackles Or Behind Them (i.e. Running Or Wing Backs, but not tight ends on the line as under existing rules) Unless Existing Allowed Permitted Shifts.

Running Backs Shifting Or Motioning Otherwise Under Existing Rules Anywhere On Offense Count As Only One Of The Players For Purposes Of This Rule.

For Purposes Of The Count, Both Split Or All Tri Backs (i.e. wishbone, Power I, full house) Shifting In The Backfield SIMULTANEOUSLY To Re-Set Count Only As One Player.

Once A Player Has Moved In Any Way, It Counts Against The Maximum Of Only Two Permitted Total Offensive Players And/Or Permitted Shifts Allowed To Move Per Play Before The Snap, And He Cannot Be Substituted By The Movement Of Another Player Even Should He Stop

For Safety No Player May Move Forward In Motion Before The Snap In The Area Between The Imaginary Lines Extending Vertically From Two Yards Outside Of Where The Tackles Line-Up. This Restriction Should Exist Largely For Safety Reasons For Play On The Line. A permitted shift by running backs is an exception as stated above, but all players inside this area must be set at the time of the snap.

Players outside this area need not be set at all a the time of the snap so long as they not are not in motion AND not within one yard of the LOS.

Discussion

Other than annoying stoppages of play due to non-impact penalties such as illegal motion or illegal shift, why should not the receiving game in the NFL be opened up a bit more to some degree?

Solid passing quarterbacks are already scarce enough I say, and such a change to expand offensive motion before the snap opens matters up even more for offenses even in short yardage situations when normally eight or more men on defense are stuffed "in the box" for what we see all too often as yet another dull "cloud of dust" play or another penalty called due to illegal motion or an illegal shift.