NFL Bounty Scandal 2012

This article sums up the hypocrisy of the players, some coaches, and some members employed by the NFL, given the revolving doors over time, on the matter of player safety.

[url=http://aol.sportingnews.com/nfl/story/2012-03-03/bounty-scandal-reveals-sad-truth-players-dont-care-about-themselves]http://aol.sportingnews.com/nfl/story/2 ... themselves[/url]

There is no way more folks also working for the actual NFL did not know that bounties were going on all these years, and some of us fans figured it was going on as well but not so far as bounties to actually maim players.

At least the NFL is owning up to the situation to clean up the game, but they have just scratched the surface with four teams implicated so far.

The players' class action lawsuits for sake of NFL neglect for of their safety and for sake of pursuit of their long-term medical benefits, given the willful participation of many of the same players in also the bounty systems over the years, should not go as far now let alone the negotiating position of the NFLPA for sake of such benefits via the CBA and NFL retirement programs.

Has anyone been following it? I've only quickly browsed articles. Am I to believe that Sean Payton and the Saints GM were giving players bonuses if they injured their opponents? WTF is that? :expressionless:

I think everyone is blowing this out of proportion, this has been happening for the entire existence of the league. While I don't agree that it is a good policy to have, I don't think it is right to single out the saints.

sorta like almost everyone speeds, but few get caught 8)

And as our own former President Bill Clinton said, "It's not the mistake that gets you. It's the cover-up."

And it turns out Joe Gibbs of the Washington Redskins, after direct denials a few days ago of knowledge of a program for bounties under Williams, was handing out $100 bills in the locker room as "incentives" not "bounties." Only in Washington could they attempt to spin BS like that and expect the rest of the country to swallow it hook, line, and sinker. I lived there 7.5 years over two occasions to know their loser political culture that will never change all too well.

Either NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell comes down hard on ALL parties, not just singling out the Saints or in retrospect the likes of James Harrison, or Goodell not only loses the credibility he has built to overcome many challenges so far but he'll lose also considerable footing for sake of legal liability for the league.

The US sports television media coverage led by the likes of ESPN, as includes feigned outrage when in fact we know they have closer access to players than do most of us and probably don't have their heads always that far up their ... :slight_smile: , is also laughable and typical of the sorry likes of them.

After reading a few articles also like the one below, the print and online media coverage actually has been rather good.

Nothing like the Manning and Tebow talk, let alone the draft coming up in five weeks, to down out this matter and noise eh?

Here’s the punishment for this bountry scandal:

Saints coach Sean Payton has been suspended for one year, former defensive coordinator Gregg Williams was suspended indefinitely, general manager Mickey Loomis was suspended for eight regular-season games, the team was fined $500,000 and lost two second-round draft picks (one in 2012 and '13) as a result of a bounty program conducted by the team during the 2009-11 seasons.

[url=http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/7718136/sean-payton-new-orleans-saints-banned-one-year-bounties]http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/77181 ... r-bounties[/url]

Nobody will believe me but I remember when they went to the super bowl I was the only person I knew not cheering for them. People would ask me why and I would say because based on some of their hits on Warner and whichever other qb they injured, it looked like there was intent to injure

What a joke, bounties are there openly stated or otherwise. Basically like fighting in hockey, a coach doesn't need to say anything, the players on the team that are on the team more for their 'prowess' rather than their pure ability over guys who didn't make it, know when it is their time to do what they have to do. At least in football though no one is on the team for anything other than pure ability over other guys, unlike hockey.

The NFL just wants to look squeaky clean and I guess they have to do what they have to do. But it's a joke.

GoRiders, you say looked like there was intent to injure. Hmmm, I would say that is fairly subjective in a sport like football. Specifics please...

I don't buy your argument, Earl. Just because it's common place doesn't mean it should be accepted. In an era when injuries are becoming more severe, all the leagues are trying to cut down on "extracurricular violence." In the NBA, if your hand touches the opponent's head, you're likely going to be called for a flaggrant foul. And many people are trying to get rid of the fighting in hockey.

In addition to Chief's comments with which I agree and for which I agree with the commissioner's decision 100% as delivered today, I would add the following:

Notorious precedents have been set to this day in many parts of the country at even amateur levels before the NCAA including in South Florida for which politicians had to step in to clean-up. Many kids since at least the 1980s have been taught wrongly by some coaches such that intent to injure, rather than just hit hard to make the play as is perfectly acceptable, has only grown with those kids growing up into the NCAA and NFL games. Of course one result has been for decades poor tackling techniques especially in the secondary including at the NFL level, but now the tide has finally turned in favour of more complete players in the secondary rather than just speed demons and those looking for the highlight pop to a guy's head as has been for the most part outlawed at last.

The NFL has to act decisively strongly on all matters of player safety so as to mitigate the damages it will likely end up paying in the litigation in which it is involved including in the class-action lawsuit by former players and in the Dave Duerson case.

Look, let me say what I mean't is I don't blame the league for doing what they did and suspending the coach for a year and the GM for 6 months I think it is and whatever else. I get that, you can't have openly said bounties and the league had to administer harsh discipline. That's fine.

All I'm saying is that bounties are there anyways, the Saints just let it out openly. You are telling me that players don't get some little bonuses here and there for a great hit on a star player that puts the guy out of the game? I'm sure that happens all the time and will continue to happen. Heck, even in high school football the real hard hitters and tough players were the coaches pets.

Hmm. Not sure what I think about this yet...

Senate to hold hearing on bounties

I'd also like to know if it's only the little decal stars that players receive on players helmets for excellent plays that you see on the helmets of some college players? I think Ohio State used to do this, not sure if they still do. :?

From wiki:

The practice of awarding helmet stickers is often credited to Ernie Biggs, trainer at Ohio State University under legendary coach, Woody Hayes. But as recently shown on ESPN, the practice of awarding stickers has been credited to Jim Young (American football coach), former assistant coach at Ohio's Miami University in 1965, two years before they were used at Ohio State. The stickers stem from fighter pilots marking their planes with stickers after kills and/or successful missions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helmet_sticker

I am fully in support because given that US is making the transition to a more publicly-funded health care system akin to the rest of the western world, and given that these bounties have been around on for decades at every level of football, the overall elimination of any activity in any endeavour, not just sports, that endorses intentional injury to others and as is distinguished from fair play, is indeed in the public interest.

By contrast, rugby union had managed to police itself for decades without government intervention for the most part. The self-discipline includes, despite as fun as it sounds, the elimination of beer from the sidelines in the 1970s due to rampant alcoholism.

When folks cannot behave themselves after being given multiple opportunities to make correction and do so, it is the government's duty and in the public's largest interest to weigh into the matter definitively.

So far otherwise Goodell has done enough to the coaches involved and to the Saints organisation, and I sure hope he sticks it to the players involved including Jonathan Vilma as the top and rightful target.

Paolo, do you know who Don Cherry is? Although not everything is red-neckisk about him, his promoting of the continuation of fighting in the game of hockey is to me intentionally promoting injuring others and yet this man is glorified by many here in Canada and the government run television broadcaster CBC pays him a lot of money to do in between period commentaries. He makes money for the CBC because people like watching him but he's a disgrace to the country in this aspect of promoting fighting violence in the game. :roll:

Yes of course I know who he is, but I only learned two years ago when he was put on air on NBC during the Olympic hockey tournament. He seemed really cool, and I proposed on this forum to trade Chris Berman for him.

Now that I read from you about his advocacy of fighting in hockey, I agree he's a disgrace.

Now I'll have to find another way to get rid of Chris Berman.

He loves fighting in hockey which is unfortunate as I say he has some great thoughts and isn't all red neckish. But Crosby put him in his place at the junior all-star game and when that happens, from a junior, you should be gonzo. But then we are talking CBC sports which is desperate for any ratings at all with anything. Thank god the CFL isn't on that network any longer.