New Stadium for the Bombers

Looks like plans are well underway for a new stadium for the Bombers on the campus of U of Manitoba.

[url=http://www.winnipegsun.com/news/winnipeg/2010/03/30/13416296.html]http://www.winnipegsun.com/news/winnipe ... 16296.html[/url]

Will have to wait and see how it plays out.

[url=http://www.cbc.ca/canada/story/2010/03/31/mb-bomber-stadium-winnipeg.html?ref=rss]http://www.cbc.ca/canada/story/2010/03/ ... ml?ref=rss[/url]

[ There is an artist's conception of the stadium

and an aerial view of the property attached ]

Bombers to get new stadium for 2012

Manitoba helps fast-track construction with $90M loan

Last Updated: Wednesday, March 31, 2010 | 11:41 AM ET

CBC News

The Winnipeg Blue Bombers will be playing

in a new stadium in 2012 and hosting the Grey Cup there in 2015.

The provincial government is giving Winnipeg business magnate David Asper

a $90-million bridge financing loan to fast-track construction
of a $137-million stadium on the University of Manitoba campus

that will also include a new facility for amateur athletics.

...The new stadium will have 33,000 permanent seats but be able
to accommodate 40,000 for major events like the Grey Cup

The stadium will be built on an eight-hectare site...

An inflatable dome will cover the field in winter

so university teams can use it during the CFL off-season.

In addition to the stadium, the site will feature a multiplex athletic facility

[and a refurbished university stadium and a new fitness centre.]

The federal government had pledged $15 million — for the amateur sport
component of the facility — and the Manitoba government offered up $20 million.

Those commitments are still in place, along with the newly announced loan.

That is impressive. And to be up and running by 2012. Maybe the people involved in Hamilton can get some good ideas and input from this construction project to incorporate into a stadium here

Looking excellent for sure. I realize not every city which has a university and CFL team can partner on such a plan, McMaster just doesn't have the room, but it sure does make a lot of sense if it can be done, CFL and university together like this.

They seem to be getting 33,000 permanent seats ($137 mil) for what we hope to get (with additional private funding) for 25,000 seats. (Plus the inflatable dome for winter)

Is the PanAm stadium "luxurious" vs a "bare-bones" one in Winnipeg (though the rendering doesn't look "cheap")?

Or is remedial clean-up cost included in our stadium proposal???

I remember it was described as more of a cadillac stadium and they had a price per seat breakdown and Hamilton's was higher than a couple of others including Winnipeg's with the implication that it would be nicer.

Still think we have to go for more than 25,000 seats.

Captain, you'll like what the MLS commish, Garber, says about stadiums being in the downtown area. Check out the article I posted on the main CFL thread about this in the thread about soccer becoming Canada's no. 2 spectator sport behind hockey.

Actually not Garber mentioning this specifically in that article but rather the author saying there is a feeling that soccer stadiums are best downtown or at least not in the boonies.

Again though, Hamilton is a different bird being right along a very busy highway.

Based on the comment section of that article, it sounds like there's a lot of resistance to that stadium project as well.

Yes looking at the amount of negative comments the taxpayers of Manitoba aren't happy at all with the NDP government and the stadium deal.

Most of the time, stadiums where even part of taxpayer monies are being used will get people up in arms, especially those that aren't into sports and even those that are into sports. So they go on the article sites and post and say the arts aren't being funded or the sewers need upgrading etc. It's only natural really as a lot of people don't see any benefit to a community for large arenas and stadiums. Honestly, myself even as a fairly big sports fan questions at times, most times, large arenas and stadiums unless it can be proven that professional sports teams using such stadiums will end up being profitable for everyone and not just the pro athletes themselves.

Yeah, me too, Earl.
I've softened a bit on my 'no money for stadiums' stance that I used to have. I see the CFL as a bit of a different animal. To me, it's an institution that should be in line for some public support -- since, unlike the 4 major leagues -- it isn't really built with a business model that can have runaway profits. At least, not enough where teams could afford to shell out $150 - $200 million as a rational capital investment.

That said, like the arts, I think professional sports has a place for building a healthy community. There's the civic pride element, which has copious intangible spin-off effects, and I believe highlighting athletics has positive public health and fitness benefits. (However, obesity rates in the U.S -- which supports spectator sports like no other country-- would refute this...big time.) And, of course, there can be, arguably, some economic spinoffs. Plus, if it helps tackle urban renewal/ remediation, then that can have it's own set of benefits.

I've never been to Canad Inns Stadium, so no idea what state of disrepair it's in. I think, to sell these stadiums to the public at little easier, it might be best to look a the price tag amortized over the expected life of the building. Not easy to do, since they aren't necessarily in their same configuration throughout their lifespan. But, if I new that a new Ivor Wynne was going to last 50 years -- looking for say, $1.75m (or whatever the public contribution would be) per year might be easier to stomach. Especially when reflected against the costs for upkeep of an old one.

[i]I see the CFL as a bit of a different animal. To me, it's an institution that should be in line for some public support -- since, unlike the 4 major leagues -- it isn't really built with a business model that can have runaway profits. At least, not enough where teams could afford to shell out $150 - $200 million as a rational capital investment.

That said, like the arts, I think professional sports has a place for building a healthy community. There's the civic pride element, which has copious intangible spin-off effects, and I believe highlighting athletics has positive public health and fitness benefits. (However, obesity rates in the U.S -- which supports spectator sports like no other country-- would refute this...big time.) And, of course, there can be, arguably, some economic spinoffs. Plus, if it helps tackle urban renewal/ remediation, then that can have it's own set of benefits.[/i]

I agree slo. I know some people out there would disagree the CFL is in any way, shape or form different from any of the 4 major leagues and that's fair enough.

If CFL owners were laughing their way to the bank (like the Rogers guys were when they bought Skydome), then I would telling them to stay out of the public coffers. But, thats not really the case.

Even when Copps was looking to be upgraded during the Balsillie proposal, I was pretty okay with that since it would be in conjunction with a major investment that (obviously arguably) be mutually beneficial.

Guess each situation has to be looked at in isolation.