My tribute to Bud Grant!

Legendary Winnipeg Blue Bomber coach Bud Grant's name was added to those of QB Ken Ploen, OL Chris Walby, FB Gerry James, WR Milt Stegall, QB Dieter Brock and HB Leo Lewis.on the Blue Bombers' Ring of Honour at halftime of a game against the Edmonton Eskimos that took place in late September 2016:

http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General%20Album%203/General%20Album%203001/Bud%20Gr_zpsonbtd997.jpg

Here are some excerpts from Bud's simply phenomenal career:

  1. He had poliomyelitis as a kid. He accordingly took up sports to help strengthen his leg muscles!

  2. He lettered in three sports at the University of Minnesota - football, basketball and baseball! Twice he was All Big-Ten in football.

  3. He was drafted in the first round by the Philadelphia Eagles in 1950. But he was also drafted in the fourth round by the Minneapolis Lakers though! He chose basketball and played 35 games for the Lakers in the latter part of the 1949-50 season. He stayed with the Lakers for one more season in 1950-51.

  4. He then realized he would never achieve much in the NBA. He elected to switch to football and joined the Philadelphia Eagles for the 1951 season. He played defensive end that season leading the Eagles in sacks.

  5. He switched to wide receiver for the 1952 season and was second in the NFL in receiving yards with 997! He then thought he merited a healthy salary increase. The Eagles disagreed and told Grant to take it or leave it. He opted to leave it, and instead signed with the Winnipeg Blue Bombers for more money.

  6. He played both defensive back and offensive end for the Blue Bombers for the next four seasons. He led the Western Interprovincial Football Union in receiving yardage in 1953 and 1956, pass receptions in 1953, 1954 and 1956, and was named a W.I.F.U. all-star in 1953, 1954 and 1956.

  7. He still holds the CFL record for most interceptions in a playoff game with five!

  8. In 1957 he was named the head coach of the Blue Bombers at the age of 29! When later asked how long it took his former teammates to realize that he was now the boss, he replied "About five minutes."

  9. He coached the Blue Bombers to a Grey Cup berth that very first year in 1957 and then again in 1958, 1959, 1961, 1962 and 1965 with the Blue Bombers emerging triumphant in 1958, 1959, 1961 and 1962. Ironically all six of those Blue Bomber Grey Cup games were against the Hamilton Tiger-Cats.

  10. The custom of Blue Bomber linemen playing games in sub-zero November temperatures with bare arms against their similarly bare armed rivals with the Edmonton Eskimos may have originated during Bud Grant's tenure in the fifties. Simple intimidation "What, you call this cold?" Those were the days when the Western final was a best of three game affair played over the course of eight days. Football players were tough in those days.

  11. He was offered the job of head coach of the Minnesota Vikings in 1961. He turned it down at the time, but relented and accepted the position in 1967.

  12. He then engineered a rare trade between teams in the separate leagues when he acquired QB Joe Kapp from the British Columbia Lions in exchange for Canadian WR Jim Young. Young would go on to earn the appellate "Dirty Thirty" with the Lions and was inducted into the Canadian Football Hall of Fame after retirement.

  13. He wouldn't allow heaters along the Viking sidelines during games. He wanted his players to stay focused on winning the game and not warming up by the heaters. When you saw the Vikings standing like ice giants along the sideline in their purple cloaks while the other team huddled miserably by their heaters, it was pretty obvious which team would win the game!

  14. When many players took to celebrating TDs with outlandish antics in the end zone in the late seventies, Viking players did not. When a reporter asked Bud whether there was a team rule prohibiting such celebrations, his reply was "No, there's no such rule. They just better not."

  15. Bud Grant didn't like to see players fidgeting during the national anthem. He thought that standing respectfully at attention would earn not just the respect of the fans but also of the players on the other team. He accordingly had giant defensive end and former National Guardsmen Carl Eller lead his Viking teammates in national anthem practices.

  16. The player Bud Grant considered to be the best he ever coached in either league was Leo Lewis who played halfback for the Blue Bombers between the years 1955 and 1966. Leo had rushed for 8861 yards with a remarkable average of 6.6 yards per carry. You can therefore imagine Bud's astonishment in 1981 when he was told that a fellow named Leo Lewis had walked into the Vikings' training camp asking for a tryout. The applicant was the son of the Leo Lewis that Bud had coached in Winnipeg. Leo Lewis III not only made the roster that year but played for the Vikings as a wide receiver and punt returner until 1991.

  17. Bud Grant had a fear of flying. His Blue Bombers (and of course Vikings) always flew to their games though. "The players sleep more restfully in a hotel than they do on a train. I don't matter." was his explanation. 'Nuff said.

  18. A statue of Bud Grant was unveiled outside Winnipeg's Investors Group Field in October 2014.

Here are some scans of CFL cards from my collection featuring Bud Grant:

1954 Blue Ribbon

http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General%20Album%203/Blue%20Ribbon0001_zpssrvkweke.jpg

http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General%20Album%203/Blue%20Ribbon20002_zpsrjcqq27a.jpg

1963 CFL Coins

http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General%20Album%203/CFL20Coins3_zpsqophbr73.jpg

http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General%20Album%203/CFL20Coins4_zpsgzyclyiy.jpg

1964 Nalley's CFL Coins

http://i1101.photobucket.com/albums/g434/Balticprince/General%20Album%203/Nalleys20Coins2_zpsrb0mtxrp.jpg

Bud's 1956 Parkhurst card (plus a couple more).

Two of my all-time favorite cards.
Imo, there's never been a nicer-looking set of football cards than these.

Oh I agree! And yours are fabulous! Are they both as white as they appear on the screen?

Did you buy the cards slabbed or did you yourself get the cards slabbed?

???

Personally I don't like my cards slabbed. That's not the way I remember the cards I had as a kid and cards for me are all about nostalgia. Moreover I hate PSA's grading standards. PSA doesn't penalize for toning, and I penalize heavily for toning. Toning makes cards look old! PSA though penalizes off-center cards heavily, and I simply don't care as long as they're 90/10 or better. I never cared about centering as a kid, so why should I care now?

I'd only consider getting my own cards slabbed if I was planning to sell them.

:-\

Are they both as white as they appear on the screen?

Yup.

Did you buy the cards slabbed or did you yourself get the cards slabbed?

I bought these graded.


Personally I don't like my cards slabbed. That's not the way I remember the cards I had as a kid and cards for me are all about nostalgia. Moreover I hate PSA's grading standards. PSA doesn't penalize for toning, and I penalize heavily for toning. Toning makes cards look old! PSA though penalizes off-center cards heavily, and I simply don't care as long as they're 90/10 or better. I never cared about centering as a kid, so why should I care now?

PSA is much harsher on 1950s CFL cards than NFL.
They are very inconsistent as well. Especially with Blue Ribbon cards where they hand-out some downright stupid grades.

I'd only consider getting my own cards slabbed if I was planning to sell them.

I prefer to buy graded on the very high-end cards. The rare times they come around.
I've never gotten anything graded that I've purchased raw. It's too nerve-wracking putting thousands of dollars worth of cards back into the mail system.

Thanks , I Enjoyed the tribute and bio on Bud Grant . Nicely done .