Mike Sellers needs some Thunder

Former CFL Great Mike Sellers has run into health issues and his wife is reaching out to friends and fans for help…

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Remembering Mike Sellers:

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The GOAT of CFL fullbacks. Here’s hoping you get better Mike.

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Yes. Get better Mike. Let’s also hope that the US medical system gets more humane.

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Looks like he spent enough seasons in the NFL for a pension but don’t know the specifics of what that would mean monetarily.

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From my understanding his NFL pension won’t kick in until he reaches a certain age. It’s too bad that after 8+ years in the ‘Big League’ he’s facing financial ruin.

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I was thinking the same thing, I don’t want to judge, but it strikes me that he played several seasons down south, he must have earned some money, well, we all make bad decisions, I hope he gets better and can collect the money.

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In the article it said that he’s had 9 heart treatments over the last 6 months. Given how the healthcare system is over in the States, I think this was likely more health induced than poor money decisions.

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It won’t because it’s a business.

Too bad he didn’t settle in Canada, pay Canadian taxes and benefit from our universal healthcare system. We’ve got it better than most here and probably take that for granted.

Wishing him well.

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And to remember that our healthcare system, while certainly more humane than that in the U.S. from many aspects, needs to become better in some regards, for example this piece with respect to cancer care in Canada, points to how it can become more equitable for all, written by Dr. Ambreen Sayani, a scientist at Women’s College Hospital in Toronto, where she leads the Improving Cancer Care Equity (ICCE) research program. (Healthy Debate is a great site to chime in on healthcare issues in Canada):

"As Canadians, we benefit from a taxpayer funded health-care system that encompasses cancer care services. The average Canadian enjoys a life expectancy of more than 80 years and Canada boasts high cancer survival rates. While we have made incredible strides in cancer care, we must work together to ensure these benefits are equally shared amongst all people in Canada. We need to redesign systems of care so that they are:

Anti-oppressive.
We must begin by understanding and responding to historical and systemic racism that shapes cancer risk, access to care and quality of life for individuals facing marginalizing conditions. Without tackling the root causes, we will never be able to fully close the cancer care gap. This commitment involves undoing intergenerational trauma and harm through public policies that elevate the living and working conditions of all people.
Patient-centric.
We need to prioritize patient needs, preferences and values in all aspects of their health-care experience. This means tailoring treatments and services to individual patient needs. In policymaking, it involves creating policies that are informed by and responsive to the real-life experiences of patients. In research, it involves engaging patients in the research process and ensuring studies are relevant to and respectful of their unique perspectives and needs. This holistic approach ensures that patients’ perspectives are central to all aspects of health care.
Socially just.
We must strive for a society in which everyone has equal access to resources, opportunities and rights, and systemic inequalities and injustices are actively challenged and addressed. When redesigning the cancer care system, this involves proactive practices that create opportunities for all people, particularly those experiencing the most marginalization, to become involved in systemic health-care decision-making. A system that is responsive to the needs of the most marginalized will ultimately work better for all people."

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To follow-up on what Dr. Sayani mentions above, this read from Dr. Charles Hayter from many years ago, with respect to cancer care access in Ontario, is a worthwhile read and why we, as citizens, under a single-payer healthcare system, must keep governments responsible for this system, on their toes, so to speak:

“Why did the commission reject these models? This is best explained by the lack of time the commission spent in Ontario and its reliance on Richards’ opinions. The commission’s investigation lasted approximately 5 months, but only 2 days were spent in public hearings in Ontario. Most of its time was spent touring the United States and Europe. During the Ontario hearings, the commission was advised that cancer services should be geographically accessible.5However, opinions such as these were nullified by Richards’ view that all cancer services should be centralized. In fact, it was Richards’ personal opinion that adequate cancer treatment could only be given in Toronto.24 Despite the problems and criticisms that quickly emerged, the idea of centralization had been planted firmly in Ontario cancer policy and became deeply rooted when Richards himself was appointed the first managing director of the OCTRF in 1944. The problems of geography have been partially overcome by the establishment of peripheral or outreach clinics in many smaller centres, but recent data16,17,20suggest that such efforts have done little to overcome the inequities in access first pointed out by Sellers 6 decades ago.”
Hayter CR. Historical origins of current problems in cancer control. CMAJ. 1998 Jun 30;158(13):1735-40.

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Why this topic of access to healthcare in Ontario is important, well all of Canada for that matter, one important reason, is personal as a dear friend of mine who lived in Kitchener Ontario passed away shortly before the Grand River Cancer Centre opened and treated it’s first patient in the fall of 2003. A quite large urban area, Kitchener-Waterloo, where he lived as I mentioned, he couldn’t even have received palliative radiotherapy before the fall of 2003 in K-W but had to travel to London, Hamilton or Toronto to basically die with dignity, he was diagnosed with late stage cancer upon diagnosis. This is not that long ago, believe it or not. See:

“When its doors opened in 2003, the Grand River Regional Cancer Centre was a state-of-the-art diagnostic and treatment facility, enabling patients to receive the most advanced and comprehensive care available, close to home, meaning patients no longer needed to travel to London, Hamilton, Toronto, or beyond for the majority of their testing, treatment, and care.”

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A simple fix is a user pay system, a patient pays part of the expenses. Any thing that is free will always be misused, abused.

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If such a system actually helps access to more healthcare services in more communities where people live and don’t have to travel from their communities to receive decent healthcare, sure, certainly should be looked at.