Jason Boltus

I was Really Really! impressed with this guy today he has the biggest arm on the team and he was make all the right throws anyone else i know it day one but he was good

what?????

He make some good Throws today

I was really impressed as well. I dont think we have a full blown QB contraversy but Glen and Terfalis better watch their back. any chancethy might keep all four?

isnt the norm now to dress three and keep a fourth on practice roster? you may just get to see him for awhile!

very good chance they well
They did last year.
3 Active 1 Practice

Thanks Bulldog.I will keep an eye on him,the next time I show up at training camp.I thought Glenn threw some nice short passes.He has a quick release,and judging by the way Milt Stiegall was pulling them in over the years,he must be able to throw the long ball as well.But I will watch for him next weekend.

i thought all 4 qb's looked pretty good. its going to be tough deciding what order to put them in. These 2 pre season games will be huge for all the qbs.

How does Boltus look like he is adjusting to the speed of the pro-game? I know he has frekish physical attributes, but I am wondering how his is dealing with the speed differential from D3 to a pro-game and also how does he look like he is grasping and adjusting to the CFL game?

he looks like he is adjusting good. It will take him some time but i thought he looked great out there yesterday. He made some nice throws and even pulled the ball down and ran with it a few times.

Hartwick College????????????

Yes Hartwick Collage http://www.hartwick.edu/x27086.xml
Boltus is the all-time NCAA Division III leader in total offense. His career passing yardage ranks 2nd in Division III history and his 134 career touchdown passes ranks 3rd all-time. For the second consecutive season, he was a Gagliardi Regional Finalist, the Empire 8 Offensive Player of the Year, and d3football.com East Region Offensive Player of the Year. He was selected as an Associated Press Little All-American and was tabbed the both the ECAC Division III Player of the Year and the ECAC Northwest Player of the Year. For the second straight season, he led Division III football in total offense and passing yards per game, and was first in the country this season in points responsible, second in total passing yards, and third in passing efficiency. This past Wednesday, he was named Hartwick’s Roy Chipman Memorial Award for Male Athlete of the Year for the second straight year.

What do you care where he went to school? He doesn't play for your team.

Can anyone provide any update on Jason's progress? It seems in most camp articles there is no mention of him doing either well or poorly....I just wanted some current feedback on how he has looked these past few days in the main camp?

Thanks!

Its very hard to asses a QB just in camp workouts you really have to see him in game conditions. Some star CFL QBs looked bad at camp and workouts but during games were standouts. The real test is game pressure and DL wanting to rip your head off with thousands of fans watching your every move cheering and booing.

Actually it's not a question of wether I care or not....

I pay good money to see the ticats play. I have a right to post here cause I probably put more $ in Caretakers pockets than half of the posters here.

I just find it funny (not haha funny) that many Cat fans think that this guy can walk out of a glorified sandlot league (DIII) and compete against players who were stars in D1 Ball.

If this guy makes the team, then the QB situation in Tigertown isn't as good as many think.
The Cats are committed to Porter Glenn and Trafalis.....

Actually, quite often the issue is NOT where the QB went to school. Some fascinating recent research on the relationship of an institution's offensive schemes and the development of a QB's cognitive/visual skills suggests that the TYPE of offense in which one played is often more important than the LEVEL at which one played.

A QB's inherent reaction/reflex times can't really be changed so a good QB is born with these.
However, there are actual changes to the brain based upon repetitive motions and series of motions... like in a football offense. A QB from a lower ranked school who has played in an offense that demands on field decision making is waaaaay ahead in the mental development as a QB than is one who plays in a high level but highly structured design offense.

That's why top college QB's often don't make it at the next level... and why - formerly surprisingly - running backs sometimes transition into QB's. Those positions that train players into quick decision making and review of opposing defences are the real QB producers.

Yes... I know that I'm not a prof of athletics and kinesthetics but I can read outside my discipline.... can't I? :slight_smile:

"Actually, quite often the issue is NOT where the QB went to school. Some fascinating recent research on the relationship of an institution's offensive schemes and the development of a QB's cognitive/visual skills suggests that the TYPE of offense in which one played is often more important than the LEVEL at which one played."
.
You may have a point here, but I doubt this rule is cast in stone. There are many exceptions that would throw a curve on this, & I can't help but recall that Timmy Chang was brought it largely because of the 'Run & Shoot' offense he was used to. I believe that Ticat coaches tried to implement a type of 'run & shoot' tailored to T. Chang's abilities.
We know where T. Chang went, don't we? :cowboy: :cowboy: :cowboy:

Kurt Warner was bagging groceries for a living 2 years before he won the 99 Super Bowl with the Rams.

"Actually, [b]quite often [/b]the issue is NOT where the QB went to school. [b]Some [/b]fascinating recent research on the relationship of an institution's offensive schemes and the development of a QB's cognitive/visual skills [b]suggests[/b] that the TYPE of offense in which one played is [b]often [/b]more important than the LEVEL at which one played."
Please note the weasel words so favoured by us academic types! :D

*Also, please note that the 'run and shoot' or West Coast Offence really asks the QB to do very little.
Receivers stay in defined routes and are often in the same area of the field. Option plays are few (if any) etc. so the QB isn't training for complexity.