I don't care what the english teachers say

it totally aggravates me every time the guys in the booth refer to a team as IT. I don’t know when this started but I think the first time I really noticed it was last season. To heck with the english teachers, a team is THEY. grrrrr

I suppose it’s your choice to ignore proper grammar.

Agreed … use of the term “volume” for things you can count (passes, yards, catches, sacks, etc.) drives me a bit nuts … use of “number” is disappearing.

who exactly gets to decide what is proper grammar?

based on what?

Good question. The rules have evolved over time, but no one group or organization controls them. But one rule accepted by convention is that singular nouns use the singular form of verbs. So “The dog is…”, “The book is…”, etc.

So the question comes down to whether the word team is singular or plural. And every dictionary that I’ve seen defines “team” as singular. Therefore, according to convention, it’s “The team is…”.

But English is an evolving language, and as such, its rules change based on use. And as people start to use “The team are…” more, it becomes more acceptable. Perhaps you’re a leader in the evolution of the language.

And interesting take on this topic.

Use a singular verb when the members of the group are acting together as a unit.

Use a plural verb when the members of the group are acting as individuals.


http://www.learnersdictionary.com/qa/Collective-Nouns-and-Verb-Agreement

So the question now, based on this convention, is whether the announcers are talking about the team as a whole - “The team is dominating the clock” - or about the individual members - “the team are looking tired”.

That one drives me nuts as well.

Then there’s “fewer” vs. “less”.

Talking heads copying the NFL

Gotta love the relaxed commentary of Blue Jay games.

So, my complaint is the latest and greatest in the commentator slang vocabulary - The Edge when referring to all and anything going to or coming from the End of either side of the line. “He came in off the edge and hit the QB”… They tried to run off the edge and the end missed his block."

It is either and can depend on whether one means the collective as one singular group, all for one and one for all, or the collective as a group of individual members. Often the difference in meaning is inconsequential.

In the UK one is more apt to hear the plural conjugation, and in the US one is more apt to hear the singular, but either is correct.

I wasn’t aware of the UK/US difference here. But yes, there is that subtle difference between the team as a unit and the team as a collection of individuals.

I just keep thinking of the line from the movie Drumline - “One band. One sound.”

Never noticed this. No big deal.

For example when you read British sport press or watching a British video feed of rugby or soccer / football for example, the announcers will use the plural conjugation.

In the US you will almost always hear the singular.

I myself most often will use the plural.

For example “Philadelphia is” and “the Eagles are” are used interchangeably here and analogously in any given US city.

One can use also “Philadelphia are,” as they would in the UK, and I do as well without issue though you won’t hear or read that usually in US media.

Does the usage vary in Canada and if so, how?

A Canadian English textbook would be interesting.

Them REDBLACKS ain’t no good, gol darn it.

There are now many, though when I was a kid many of our textbooks were from the U.S. Our teacher sometimes had to give us advice on how to answer such questions as “who is your president?” (the correct answer was the then current prime minister, John A. MacDonald ;-).
Here are some excellent reference materials for Canadaphiles/grammarphiles:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Oxford_Dictionary
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Elements_of_Style

What has bugged me for the last 5-10 years is how media people use the word “ for?, it is now fir, or fur, or fer. There is no “O? in the word anymore.

Never noticed this. Im sure they still say for with an o

I’m sure we all have our pet peeves.

Mine are mixing up “then” and "than; mixing up “less” and “fewer”, and this dreadful “should of” instead of “should have.”

Mad Jack, if you please, translate your postscript? Thanks!

Peron delivers; Eva dignifies