hard nose coach vs player's coach

Drew Edwards, the Spectator's football beat reporter mentions on his blog http://scratchingpost.thespec.com/

that the Tiger Cats' decided to use a sports psychologist to conduct several of their interviews

at last weekends evaluation camp. As Drew says Dr. Dana Sinclair appears to be very much the real deal.

She is sometimes even on the sideline watching the communication between the coach and his players

and advising them on what they should have said so they can communicate better next time. WOW!

This caught my eye, too. re: the hard nose coach vs the player's coach etc.

My job is to help people perform to the best of their ability and that usually means

staying calm and focused on the task at hand under pressure...

Coaches who use yelling and screaming as a default behaviour often aren't very effective

and at times do run the risk of not being listened to by their players," she says.


A lot of fans won't believe that. They want coaches to "show emotion" on the sideline during the games

throw their helmets down..chew out players. Apparently, destroying their concentration makes sense to them.

[url=http://www.canada.com/theprovince/news/sports/story.html?id=59cfcf79-1514-45a8-95a6-ee49df74ce0e]http://www.canada.com/theprovince/news/ ... 49df74ce0e[/url]

I don't associate hard nose with a screamer but whatever...

While "screaming" per se may not be an effective tool, neither will a passive, coddling coach.

For an authoritative figure to be respected with communication adherence, a decisive and firm theology should be in place.
Generally speaking, players respond to affirmative and resolute instruction based not only on individual responsibility, yet also communal inclusiveness and orientation.

Goals and performance requirements/guidelines need to be clearly asserted by the coaching staff, juxtaposed with a resulting consequence if expectations are not met.

Once such communication is utilized, respect and compliance should follow.

IMO :stuck_out_tongue:

Spoken like a .... coach :wink:

Don't passively coddle the man's utterance, HfxTC. :roll: Tell it like it is..tell him it's technobabble

that few people other than Sheldon and Leonard from the Big Bang Theory TV program understand. :smiley: :stuck_out_tongue:

I thought HfxTC's assertions were clearly and firmly communicated, revealing once again, the undeniable fact, that yes, I am a blowhard.
and for that, respect. :rockin:

see, it works! :wink:

That’s because HfxTC’s comment was straight to the point

"Spoken like a .... coach" :wink:
not a[i] tangled web [/i] of ramblings that blowhards like you use. :wink:
For an authoritative figure to be respected with communication adherence, a decisive and firm theology should be in place. Generally speaking, players respond to affirmative and resolute instruction based not only on individual responsibility, yet also communal inclusiveness and orientation.Goals and performance requirements/guidelines need to be clearly asserted by the coaching staff, juxtaposed with a resulting consequence if expectations are not met. Once such communication is utilized, respect and compliance should follow.
P.S.

You realize this all in fun and not meant to be offensive. :slight_smile:

That's because HfxTC's comment was straight to the point
no argument there. :wink:
not a tangled web of ramblings that blowhards like you use.
I resemble that remark. :D
P.S.

You realize this all in fun and not meant to be offensive.


I may be a blowhard, but I'm not stupid....just "special"...my teachers told me so. :wink: :smiley:

Thanks for posting this ron.

The article provides some retrospective vindication for former Ticat coach Marcel Bellefeuille who was chastised by some on these forums for not "showing emotion" on the sidelines. On the contrary Coach Bellefeuille seemed to be quite supportive of his players which appears to be more consistent with what is being espoused in this article.

A tough, disciplinarian with effective communication is where it's at. Unfortunately this is not the norm anymore and it's starting to show. Kids today are so mollycoddled at their schools, karate studios, and soccer fields that they have become the ultimate pansies. They have major self-esteem issues and can't accept any kind and constructive criticism. I've had this conversation with many dads, coaches and instructors. All of them agree that growing up in the '60s and '70s was completely different. We were beaten by the Karate instructors and school teachers and had coaches scream like drill sargeants. But damn did we perform.

As a result today's players might be bigger and faster but nowhere near as tough as the Moscas and Henleys. Especially mentally and emotionally. Therefore most of today's players would probably not respond well to a "HARD NOSED COACH". At least the military still knows how to train men and woman to be tough and adaptable soldiers where self-esteem and egos are tossed aside for the common goal of the collective.

This has to be among the biggest pile of junk I have ever read on this forum. I'm sure getting beat by a teacher really helped made someone a better student. :roll:

On topic, Marc Trestman is about as even keeled as it gets and I doubt anyone would say they don't want him as their team's head coach. He's the type of coach people should be emulating, not the frothing-at-the-mouth neanderthals that "Krisun" seems to prefer.

my ENTIRE post, line by line, point by point, you would have noticed that nowhere do I actually CONDONE beating people to get them to perform. I merely pointed out the differences of coaching and teaching styles of now and decades past. Once again read my opening line to my previous post to help "clarify" for you my stance on this subject if you are even capable of doing so.

Thanks Kris, you hit the railroad spike right on the noggin.

I'm 24, and whenever I go back a visit my old highschool teachers and coaches, they tell me that my generation (or 1987 babies) was the last productive age demographic that the human race might produce. Today, kids are becoming SOOOOOOOOOOOO soft, its sickening. Whenever a kid does poorly in something, its automatically the teachers fault, the coaches fault, societies fault, Tim Horton's fault, its the weather or their bosses fault, never the parent or childs fault, but I could spew mouth noises about generations younder than me for hrs.

Back on topic now lol, I remember playing for some real C U next tuesday's in college ball and they perpetually screamed and were complete bumholes swearing up and down the sidelines all game or all practise, we just turned them off in our heads and we played less affectively knowing that our coach couldnt stay focused and spent half the game screaming at the ref over nothing :lol: .

Mack Brown head coach of U of T on the other hand, is known for being really calm and collective with his players and doesn't get too excited about anything on the sidelines and he has had a lot of success, maybe he shows respect for his players and the refs, stays calm, and the longhorn cattle win a lot of football games.

Lane Kiffin at USC on the other hand, spends half the game running up and down the sidelines screaming at all the refs and every player coming off of the field and he never seams to have too much of a grasp on his team and doesn't win too many games. Who knows, its just my observation.

I was lucky enough to have access to a sports psychologist in my highschool days and she changed my life. She changed how I looked at the game of football, how to stay calm in pressure situations. It's hard to describe but she fast forwarded my mental maturity a couple years after only 4 -5 sessions. Her help allowed me to cope with a high pressure situations I face today as an adult at work as a petroleum geologist. Either way, this will do nothing but help the Ticats on and off the field with the mental stuff :thup: .