Greetings From Southern California

Hello All,

Just wanted to say hello. Because of Sirius radio and DirecTV, I have become a fan of the CFL. While I live in the US (Southern California) and have never gotten a chance to see a CFL game live, I enjoy the season and follow it through to the Grey Cup final. My first game had Winnipeg playing, and became a fan. I also am glad that they play during the summer, so I do not have to endure NASCAR and Tennis on TV. Even after the NFL season starts, I still follow the CFL season, and Winnipeg in particular, until the end of the season (November?)

I for one, would love to see the Super Bowl winner vs. the Grey Cup winner play each other. Maybe, they can play 1/2 of the game under NFL and the other 1/2 under CFL rules.

Also, I went to the University of Southern California. Does anybody know if any former USC players are on the CFL rosters?

Looking forward to a great season.

David

Welcome Dave. I used to live in So Cal in Fullerton. glad to hear you’re a fan. As for your question, Zeke Moreno was a USC alum that’s played in the CFL the last 4-5 years. This past offseason he was released by Toronto and hasn’t gotten on with any other team. No other USC players come to mind right away that are actively playing currently this season, but who knows once NFL cuts come in August/September. Couple of Pac10 guys in the league though, Bernard Hicks (Bombers practice roster) and Robert Jordan (BC) from Cal, Alex Brink from Washington State is the 3rd QB on the Bombers, Joe Eppele (Toronto) also from washington state, Joe Lobendahn (bombers) and Cody Pickett (Stampeders) from Washington, Brandon Browner (Stampeders) from Oregon State, and Justin Hickman (Hamilton) from the crosstown rivals at UCLA. If you look through the rosters I’m sure there are a few more.

Welcome to the CFL forum, Dave! Bombers play tonight, but I don't think it's on US tv. Maybe try Justin.tv?
Anywhoo, you picked a great club to side with, and we welcome you with open arms! Enjoy the season!

You will soon be a ticatfan after tonights thrashing of the BB's

Welcome DAVE. whats your favorite team in CFL.

See you around USC4Dave and welcome! Notre Dame alum here (with one good USC alumnus as a friend too) so I know you all well of course. :lol:

All the same I enjoy only Pac10 football plus Notre Dame plus Florida mostly for NCAA ball, but now I am enjoying CFL ball even more than NCAA and you are right as otherwise our options are so lame down here with also that LEBRON! slobberfest and baseball.

You might enjoy CFL offences a lot too like me because so many plays look more like NCAA West Coast ball with the quick short passes or the common spread sets as are not used quite as much in the NFL though growing in popularity. More on that current development and trend and others as I have posted in the NFL section too.

With time perhaps you'll see like me and other fans of X's and O's how each type of gridiron football, though with different fine traditions, rules, and skills, has a somewhat common coaching base with which schemes that are successful sort of bleed into the other brands of football.

I for one, would love to see the Super Bowl winner vs. the Grey Cup winner play each other. Maybe, they can play 1/2 of the game under NFL and the other 1/2 under CFL rules.
I was thinking about this last night again after that game and this matchup would be the ultimate! The best resolution would be to play a home-and-home series with each team's respective league rules for at least a whole game. First it ought be tried as an exhibition by two non-champion teams too.

Food For Thought
-Can you imagine for example an NFL team dependent a lot on the run being forced to spread it out more when visiting the Canadian team?

-And then wouldn't it be cool to see an ultra-quick and strong NFL pass-rush give the CFL linemen the battle of their lives but have to start a yard back?

-And then when the CFL team visits down here, it'll be cool to see how they manage to use the space on the smaller field with one fewer guy with their spread offence playbook. Contrary to likely popular belief, I do NOT see an accomplished CFL quarterback having problems getting the ball out fast enough or receivers getting open for short windows. Think West Coast offense here as by my count only the 49ers using now with Seattle and Philadelphia using hybrid elements. We'd likely see more of something smooth and new missing from most NFL football but for when the elite quarterbacks play.

-Visiting CFL defence against NFL offencive line? The battle of their lives too! Also the CFL defencive backs will have to be far more physical within the allowed five yards down here with the NFL's largely taller, faster, and stronger receivers on the whole (think in terms of last night of tall receivers like Jamel Richardson, S J Green, and P. Rodriguez being the norm in the NFL AND being able to shove around the DB's more too).

Hello All,

Well thanks again to the magic of Sirius, I got to listen to the Bombers take their first step to the Grey Cup! A great win at home. They are now in first place in their division.

I have a question for the board. I still do not know all the rules of the game. How does a team manage to score 1 point? If someone hear can explain it to me, I would appreciate it.

Looking forward to a great Bomber season!

David

Hello All,

Well thanks again to the magic of Sirius, I got to listen to the Bombers take their first step to the Grey Cup! A great win at home. They are now in first place in their division.

I have a question for the board. I still do not know all the rules of the game. How does a team manage to score 1 point? If someone hear can explain it to me, I would appreciate it.

Looking forward to a great Bomber season!

David


From Wikipedia:

Single

Scored when the ball becomes dead in the possession of a team in its own goal area, or when the ball touches or crosses the dead-line, or side-line-in-goal, and touches the ground, a player, or some object beyond these lines as a result of the ball having been kicked from the field of play into the goal area by the scoring team. It is worth one point. This is different from a Safety (see above) in that team scored against receives possession of the ball after the score.

Officially, the single is called a rouge (French for "red") but is often referred to as a single. The exact derivation of the term is unknown but it has been thought that in early Canadian football, the scoring of a single was signalled with a red flag.

you could try going to tsn.ca and watch the games on demand, you should be able to get the full game online.

Skip perhaps to the end of this post for the “punchline” if pressed for time, and then if you still don’t believe it just read the details and research for yourself.

Note a bit of history here as follows from some research I was able to do in the past few months as a new fan of the Canadian game when looking into various seemingly strange rules in various codes of football. No of course don’t take this as gospel, but this is the best I have come across so far to offer a closer explanation. Another example that comes up by comparison from Canadians for sake of the game of American football is that of our fair catch, and that’s in another thread and for another time for the details.

Regarding the derivation of the term “rouge” in contrast to the above common explanation and more plausible IMHO, I have read that before the formation of the Football Association in 1871 to codify the rules of “Association Football” as we know now as soccer/football (and the formation later that year of the Rugby Football Union due to a schism about being able to carry the then still round ball as well), in some local games of football in the UK a literal “rouge” was scored for kicks that went outside the goal posts.

Mind you at the time, before the respective codifications of American football headed largely by Walter Camp about 1881 and of what was called “rugby football” or just “rugby” in Canada, but not quite the same as the actual code of rugby union as the predecessor to what later became what we know now as Canadian football, various games of football were played in both the US and Canada with more of those in Canada resembling more rugby allowing carrying of the ball and most of those in the US, largely in the Northeast, resembling soccer in not allowing carrying of the ball but still other forms of allowed handling of the ball as present in the common rules of the time.

In 1859 decades even before such codifications of gridiron football however, apparently the earliest codification of the game we see today of Australian Rules Football was played in Australia and had within it as it does today a method of scoring 1 point for kicks going wide of the goal, which in turn in its modern form is worth also 6 points just like in gridiron football. Also note what is now a touchdown in gridiron football and a try in rugby was originally referred to all the same as a goal, and it’s no accident that to this day we still say “First And Goal” not “First And Score” or “First And Touchdown” and in some cases “Goal Area.”

What you will see to this very day when watching the seemingly odd game of Aussie (pronounced “Ozzie”) Rules is sort of a time warp of how football was played before even formation of the FA in 1871. And Down Under, by a similar scoring principle, 1 point is scored for what is known as a “behind” in similar fashion to the rouge of Canadian football as was preceded in football other than Australian in years before the codification of the FA, Rugby Football Union, Canadian Rugby Fooball Union, and collegiate American football. The “behind” in Aussie Rules in fact is what you see today as a rouge and existed long before the current rules of Canadian football. What you see today as a rouge was adopted by Canadian football all the same from the older football games at some point by the predecessor to the CFL the Canadian Rugby Football Union as formed in 1882.

That’s an interesting theory, could be possibly true.

The explaination I’ve always heard was that in the early days the single point was decucted from the other team (ie a point
“in the red”), instead of being given to the kicking team.

Welcxome Dave- As discussed in another thread,. the rouge or single point goes back to the origins of "Football" and certainly belongs in the rules of Canadian football. Note to CFL newbees a rouge is NOT awarded for a missed field goal. it is awarded when the ball is not retirned out of the endzone.by Massdestruction » 20 Mar, 2010 - 03:18

Canadian rouge similar to Aussie rules scoring. http://www.aussierulesuk.com/about/scoring