Division Final - Montreal @ Hamilton

One thing I’ve noticed recently is that we’ve been giving up more yards against the run right as we’ve started running more of a 3-4 defense with Hebert and Venable frequently on the field at the same time. Coincidence? Not sure what to make of it, but we know Austin doesn’t like to run the football more than he has to, so it might work in our favor.

Les schémas 3-4 ont commencé à faire surface lorsque les Alouettes avaient battu les Timinous en septembre.

Je crois que Austin est assez sage pour prendre ce que la défensive des Alouettes vont donner. Si les Alouettes concèdent le jeu au sol, il va tenter d'exploiter cette brèche. D'ailleurs, au début de la partie, les Lions avaient des résultats avec leur jeu au sol. Mais comme lors de la partie contre les Roughriders, les Alouettes se sont ajustés et ont commencé à limiter les gains de Logan et Brown pour finalement ne plus concéder grand chose. Ils se sont tournés vers le jeu aérien, mais n'ont pas eu le succès escompté. Ça ne veut pas dire qu'Austin tomberait dans le même panneau. Je crois qu'Austin aurait trouvé une autre façon de revenir avec un bon jeu au sol.

Ce qui pourrait aider les Alouettes la semaine prochaine est le retour de Knapton. Avec sa vitesse, il peut aller en couverture et rappliquer rapidement sur le ballon si l'adversaire y va par la course. Il peut se positionner autant comme ailier défensif que comme secondeur extérieur. Également, Cash était rouillé et il devrait être plus à l'aise la semaine prochaine.

Disons qu'en vue de cette partie, j'ai plus de préoccupations pour l'attaque que pour la défensive. Les Alouettes pourront difficilement se permettre un lent départ, comme c'est leur habitude. Il va falloir qu'ils trouvent une façon de soutenir leurs séquences à l'attaque et mettre des points au tableau plus tôt dans la partie.

J'ai bien aimé la prestation de Rutley et je crois que les Alouettes ne sont pas diminués avec lui comme porteur. Il est différent de Sutton et de Rainey, mais il tire très bien son épingle du jeu.

Agreed, but Austin isn't a run-first guy and the Cats have had issues with their ground game this year, so it will be interesting to see whether they can move the ball effectively on the ground.

Disons qu'en vue de cette partie, j'ai plus de préoccupations pour l'attaque que pour la défensive. Les Alouettes pourront difficilement se permettre un lent départ, comme c'est leur habitude. Il va falloir qu'ils trouvent une façon de soutenir leurs séquences à l'attaque et mettre des points au tableau plus tôt dans la partie.
Absolutely. The offense can't afford to start out ice-cold for a whole quarter against the Cats, at THF. We need to take the crowd out of it early.
J'ai bien aimé la prestation de Rutley et je crois que les Alouettes ne sont pas diminués avec lui comme porteur. Il est différent de Sutton et de Rainey, mais il tire très bien son épingle du jeu.
It's why I don't understand the talking point that our O-linemen can only pass-block. Bomben, Perrett, and LBJ ran roughshod over the right side of the Lions' D-line yesterday. We were getting an O-lineman on a linebacker on those big running plays, giving the ball-carrier five yards before anyone even touched him. Don't tell me we can't run the ball. ;)

If we're to have any success against Hamilton this week, we have to impose our will, our game plan, on them. I don't care how good the Cats are at run D -- we NEED to run the ball effectively in order to win. So one way or another, Dinwiddie, Garcia & co. have to figure out how to run the ball against Steinauer's run-stopping defense. No excuses. We have Sutton, Rainey, and Rutley at our disposal and our O-line just finished a game in which we dominated along the ground. So let's find ways to play to our strengths. Working out of the two-back set would be a good start, as would using Tanner Marsh in a package of run plays. A few called scrambles for Crompton might help stretch the Hamilton D as well.

Personally, I would like to see a pitch option run out of our jet formation with Sutton or Rutley as the potential pitch recipient and Rainey as the backside end-around. Pitch out to Sutton/Rutley early in the game and see if we can't attack Hamilton's flank with O-linemen pulling to block; on subsequent plays, try the end-around if we've had success on the pitchout. If we just try to run between the tackles, we won't get anywhere. We have to attack the perimeter to open up the interior for north-south running.

I think that, if we either release or reassign Dinwiddie somewhere for next season, you should be our offensive coordinator.

Along with ST coach.

:D Frankly, I think any one of us here could do a better job with special teams than Ned Flanders. :lol:

Offense is a tough issue. I haven't liked Dinwiddie's playcalling a lot this year but he's also working with a QB who isn't really playing at a pro level right now. And I notice that Dinwiddie is back in the spotter's booth these days instead of on the sidelines, which I continue to think hurts his ability to make timely adjustments during a game. On the sidelines, you can respond faster; you're seeing the game at eye level. In the booth, you might have a better view of the game, but adjustments will be slower to come. If I were Higgins, I'd force Dinwiddie to stay on the sideline and have one of the coaches (Schonert?) man the spotter's booth. Garcia is likely a great help at ground level but someone has to tell Crompton when he blows a read.

Well I noticed RD is connected to Schonert so that is going on and Schonert is very active on the sidelines with the players. Definitely need a ST coordinator and one with the power to ask for specific player profiles and a say in the make up of the roster.

We ran the ball all over BC. Doing so against Hamilton is a much tougher task. Their front four is beastly and isn't going to let us block with four lineman while getting the 5th on a linebacker unless we wear them down sideline to sideline first. Get them in chase mode for a few drives and THEN go back inside to pound the ball, once they're breathing hard. :slight_smile:

To that end, I'd like to see us make a commitment to burning HAM's rush ends if they overplay the run RIGHT AWAY. So, on the first play on the first offensive series, run a QB roll off play action. If Crompton can pick up 5+ yards on that roll, we'll have planted the seed of doubt in Hamilton's defensive ends right away and taken the edge off their willingness to run-blitz the RB. So maybe the next time, there's a better lane for Sutton/Rutley because the ends now have to respect the possibility of Crompton breaking to the outside. And the logical extension of that play would be Crompton going play action on the half roll but then throwing on the run to the field WR (or possibly the boundary slot on a shallow cross once the field WR and field slot have "cleared out" the underneath coverage by going deep).

What I'm essentially saying is: when running the ball, we have to attack the whole field, including the perimeter, and we have to use every trick in our playbook to misdirect and confuse the Cats, whose run D is second to none. If we think we're going to have success by just running our standard package of run plays in ordinary sequence, we'll get stuffed for nothing, Dinwiddie will go away from the run game, and bad things will happen to us. Dinwiddie, Garcia, Schonert, Sweet, and Speckman have to sit down and come up with a creative game plan to attack Hamilton and then make sure every play is properly installed.

This is our season now. Win or go home. Everyone has to bring their A game, INCLUDING the coaches.

That's good to know, but something still needs to change, because we have made a habit of doing squat for the first 15 minutes of a game. We've talked about this before but I'll say it again: those scripted plays are garbage and need an overhaul. A good OC can script the first few plays but also get RESULTS with those plays. Right now it's just a lab experiment, especially that stupid handoff on first down which we always do with zero gain or loss of yardage.

Actually the hand off to Rutley to open the drive was funny. the Lions crashed the run right away. They KNEW that was the play the team would open the game with. He went nowhere of course. They also tried that short pass to the RB only once. I don't know why but Crompton CAN NOT make that pass. He rushes it... That' something he really needs to master in the off season and training camp next year. Maybe they should try throwing it underhand (slow pitch style), get it out quicker instead of trying to throw it over a defender.

I know, it's pathetic. Everyone and their brother knows it's coming so every team just crashes the RB with no respect for QB contain or defending the pass off play action. I know they want to get a sense of how the other team is playing the run in that situation but you can get that info AND be productive if you just change when you call the play. Or maybe run it out of a different formation.

They also tried that short pass to the RB only once. I don't know why but Crompton CAN NOT make that pass. He rushes it... That' something he really needs to master in the off season and training camp next year. Maybe they should try throwing it underhand (slow pitch style), get it out quicker instead of trying to throw it over a defender.
This is precisely why I want to see a HB pitch so we can get the RB running in the flat with the ball in his hands. Crompton throws the worst short pass to the flat I've ever seen. Rushing the throw, too much mustard, not enough touch. If he wants to be a real pro QB, he has to be able to make that throw with some degree of consistency in the long term.

I was right in the line of site of that throw and it looked like a cross between a hand grenade and a Star of David. A pro QB that can't make a 15 yard toss :lol:

He won't be a pro QB if he can't make that throw. What we've accomplished this year is not sustainable. At some point, he needs to put on his big-boy pants and do the things that a pro QB can do under center. That includes making all the throws, calling protection audibles, making accurate pre-snap reads, checking down when the primary read isn't open, and varying his snap cadence so the defensive front isn't teeing off on the O-line every snap.

Its a mixed bag. He's a big dude and his release is quick and high, strong arm, Tough as nails but he doesn't throw a nice ball, poor touch, bad mechanics when pivoting and not sure he has a great vision of the field but there is lots to like if he can fix the bad stuff.

Agreed, IF he can fix the bad stuff, he’ll be a good starting QB. What he does this offseason will tell me a lot about whether he gets it. Anyone can be a ~GUNSLINGER~ but if you want to have a career, you have to take care of the other stuff. Another reason why getting AC here as QB coach would be great. AC faced a lot of these same issues at the start of his career but he put in the work to fix them. If he can get Crompton to do the same…

On dit de Crompton qu'il travaille fort. C'est déjà un bon point de départ.

Dans cette dernière partie, il a réussi UNE passe voilée dans le flanc. C'est plus que dans tous ses autres départs. Peut-être que ça s'en vient?

Pour le reste, je crois que ça peut s'améliorer avec du travail et du temps de jeu. Crompton a au moins la qualité de ne pas paniquer et c'est quelque chose qui peut aider à l'apprentissage.

Les Alouettes devront jouer avec la même intensité contre les Timinous, probablement un cran de plus pour la ligne à l'attaque. Cette partie va se jouer dans les tranchées. Les joueurs des Alouettes devront réussir à créer les brèches nécessaires pour que l'attaque au sol puisse arriver à faire quelque chose. Je crois que la présence de Rutley à la place de Rainey devrait aider. Rutley est plus solide sur ses pieds et il voit plus rapidement les ouvertures.

D'autre part, les Alouettes auront besoin de la contribution de London et de l'autre receveur dans cette partie. Crompton devra être capable de regarder dans leur direction de temps en temps s'il veut que les Timinous donne un peu d'espace à Green et Carter.

I posted this on the Hamilton boards, so for Als' fans who don't visit there, here's my take on Sunday's game; I think the teams match pretty evenly overall, with one big exception.

I certainly don't expect a high scoring affair, I think it'll be a defensive struggle, and we're going to see two pretty darn good defences. I'd rate Hamilton's D line as superior to Montreal's; LB corps I give the edge to Montreal, and the secondaries are about equal in my view. Safety I'd suggest is pretty much even; Montreal's HBs are marginally better than Hamilton's, but on the corner Breaux is superior to either (both, even) of Montreal's corners.

On offence, I give Montreal the nod on the O line, and in the running game. Collaros however I rate higher than Crompton, and certainly Green & Carter are the best 2 receivers in the game, but one of them will be neutralized by Breaux as in the last matchup between these 2 teams.

Coaching advantage goes to Hamilton, as long as Austin doesn't blow a gasket. Condell over Dinwiddie as O/C; Thorpe maybe slightly ahead of Steinauer.

But what really tips the scales in favour of the Cats, to my mind, are these two factors:

  1. Home field advantage; Cats unbeaten at THF;

  2. Special teams; huge advantage Hamilton here.

So, I see a close, low-scoring game, with a Hamilton kick return for a TD being the difference.

21-14 Hamilton.

Great analysis,MadJack.

While I hope for a win by the Als, I too would not be surprised if Banks does tip the scale in favour of Hamilton. He is a great returner and a good receiver.

Richard

1- Als Offensive line and penalties will decide this game.