DemoCamp with Bob Young

DemoCamp is a regularly occurring event in the Hamilton technology and startup business community. The events start off with a keynote talk on a startup business or tech related topic, followed by a series of live tech demos done by local tech startups. Each demo is followed by Q&A... it's kinda like show & tell for business-minded and nerdier-than-most folks. :smiley:

The next DemoCamp is this Thursday evening, and it will feature a keynote talk by Tiger-Cat Caretaker Bob Young! As I'm sure you most of you know, Bob is the founder of online self-publishing distribution platform Lulu, and was formally the CEO of RedHat!

The events are free-to-attend, and anyone interested in locally-built technology is welcome to attend. It is a technology business event, but it has a casual vibe - i.e. most of the attendees are wearing blue jeans, beer/wine is available.

Tickets to Thursday night's DemoCamp are limited and almost sold out, so registration using the link below is required to attend.

When: Thursday June 16th from 6:30pm - 9:00pm

Where: McMaster Innovation Park @ 175 Longwood Road South

Register: softwarehamilton.com/democamp

(you may need to copy paste the URL)

(My name is Kevin Browne by the way, I'm a teacher in the engineering technology programs at Mohawk College. I organize these events volunteer for fun because I'm a technology nerd, but I'm also a die-hard Tiger-Cat fan, and just wanted to give the the ticats.ca community a chance to check out the event as well!)

Would love to go but working afternoons

Sounds like a fun time. Does softwarehamilton.com have info on past events

Thanks for sharing

Yes, if you go to softwarehamilton.com and click on democamp, you can find information on the previous events.

(My name is Kevin Browne by the way, I'm a teacher in the engineering technology programs at Mohawk College. I organize these events volunteer for fun because I'm a technology nerd, but I'm also a die-hard Tiger-Cat fan, and just wanted to give the the ticats.ca community a chance to check out the event as well!)
Kevin,

While all Ticat fans use technology every day, being closely involved with the Ticats reminds me of how few people actually care about low-level technology. When I talk to senior executives at some of Canada's largest corporations and they ask about how Red Hat actually makes money their eyes glaze over when I try to explain the role of open source and server-side operating systems.

On the other hand the reverse is also true. I was at a very casual dinner at diner in 1993 with a bunch of coders in NYC. The Blue Jays were playing the Phillies in the World Series. I kept looking up at the TV in the corner of the room. Finally someone asked me what was so interesting about what was happening on the broadcast. I explained that for only the second time ever a non-US team was in the World series. They shrugged. None of them even realized (or cared) that baseball playoffs had even started.

Tech guys are, as a general rule, less frequently sports fans than the rest of humanity. :wink:

Bob, thanks for Red Hat/Fedora Linux, but why couldn't you have founded Debain instead? :slight_smile:

In case you didn't know though... Linus Torvalds is a Fedora guy, so at least you got him on your distro.

Nice! When I worked for startups and smaller companies, I attended many DemoCamps here in Toronto. They're always interesting in that you get to hear about new ideas and see some pretty interesting new tech.

There is no Debian vs Fedora. There is only Linux and Open Source and they are the future of all collaborative technologies, such as those that enable the Internet. IBM invented proprietary software in 1965. Prior to that people thought of software as not having value so they gave it away for free. But the proprietary model was an evolutionary dead end. Software engineers can build better more reliable systems if they have access to the source code and have a license that allows them to modify that code. Which is why at Red Hat we never saw Debian or Suse or Slackware as our competitors. They were allies in trying to educate the world on the value of an open source approach to building better, more secure and more reliable technology. Microsoft, and IBM, and Apple, and Oracle with their proprietary binary-only products were the competition, and still are.

On the other hand we might have to put a disclaimer on this thread before our fellow Ticat fans start to complain about our wasting forum resources discussing non-football related topics. :cowboy:

Bob, I was making a joke. Please note the smiley emoticon.

I already understand everything you wrote, but having said that, there are several distros I have tried that I did not care for too much. Ubuntu is an example, because it's simply far too bloated, and only worth running if you want your hardware to preform at a lower level.

I personally use Debian stable, and find it the most sound distro of all. Gentoo would be my next choice.

Of course. But I never miss an opportunity to evangelize. :wink:

I already understand everything you wrote, but having said that, there are several distros I have tried that I did not care for too much. Ubuntu is an example, because it's simply far too bloated, and only worth running if you want your hardware to preform at a lower level.

I personally use Debian stable, and find it the most sound distro of all. Gentoo would be my next choice.


Sounds like I've found a fellow evangelist!

Thanks for posting on this discussion Caretaker. It's not off topic at all!

The only problem I'm having, is trying to figure out........if Ubuntu is an Offensive or Defensive Lineman? And those Debian and Gentoo fellows, are they National or International players?
LOL

:)

Agreed! :smiley: