CLC and CFLPA partnership

According to an article posted on Sportsnet it appears to be some sort of an agreement between the Canadian Labour of Congress and the CFLPA interms of being an affiliate for the CLC.

Seems pretty big for the CFL players.

Thoughts

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My only questions are… Why did it take so long for this to happen? and are they doing this because they think that the next CBA talks are going to be contentious?

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Interesting, plenty of time for planning before the next CBA, Dec. 31, 2029

There is currently labour harmony between the CFL and players’ union the as the present collective agreement runs to Dec. 31, 2029.

“We’re that far out from bargaining so we’re obviously not doing this solely for that,” Ramsay said. "But we’re going to immediately become part of a larger network with common interests.

Hopefully this will draw more fans from the affiliation of CLC/CFLPA, many people who belong to a shared union, tend to support their members.

“Instantly you’ve got 3.2 million union members who’ll be exposed to our members and the game,” he said. “I also think on some of the federal issues — including immigration and work permits — we’ve struggled with in the past, we’ve now got another avenue and voice to help support us in some of the changes we might need.”

I’m not sure how this would work for the NHLPA, considering CLC is a Canadian organization and most NHL teams are in USA.

The NHLPA, for instance, has caught wind of what’s afoot. It will be keeping a close eye on how the dealings go with the football guys.

“The NHLPA has been in contact with the CFLPA regarding the CLC and we expect to have further dialogue with the CFLPA regarding their new affiliation,” said Jonathan Weatherdon, a spokesperson for the NHLPA.

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I wonder if the CFLPA had been in discussions with the NFLPA that seems to have a similar arrangement with the AFL-CIO (American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organization). Perhaps there were some cost issues as a factor from this happening in the past as I’m sure memberships in such congresses or federations don’t come free of charge?:

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For the members, I would imagine monthly dues during the length of the players contact, somewhere $50 - $75.

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PERHAPS a bit more complex for the NHLPA as most of the players they represent play for US-based teams … but couldn’t hurt for them to have “some sort” of relationship with a major Canadian and US union presence to support their activities.

The recently appointed NHLPA Executive Director, Marty Walsh, has a long history in labour relations … he was United States Secretary of Labor from 2021 to 2023; he resigned in order to accept the position as executive director of the NHLPA … Walsh’s time in government was preceded by a long history as a union member and labour leader. He followed in his father’s footsteps when he joined Laborers Local 223 in Boston, at 21 years old, and he rose to the presidency of that union. In 2011, he was appointed as the head of Boston’s Building and Construction Trades Council, which is an umbrella group of numerous local construction unions representing tens of thousands of working families.

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Yes, “to support their activities”, which are quite broad based I’m sure.

• The league and the CFLPA agreed to a seven-year deal, addressing the association’s concerns about a longer term. The CFL had initially proposed 10 years. The CFLPA was looking at five. The CBA can be reopened if and when the league signs a new broadcast contract with TSN. The current deal expires in five years. (Edit for clarity - article was written in 2022. They are referring to the TSN deal expiring in 2027).

They can also say that they are in harmony with each other but that doesn’t mean that they are on the same page (unless things have changed).

https://3downnation.com/2023/11/15/cfl-players-union-at-odds-over-2022-financials-which-will-create-revenue-sharing-baseline/

Is any professional sports league with their players association or union whatever you want to call it, on the exact or precise same page as the league and their administrators? I would say no.

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agreed, when I read a BS statement from other leagues, I will most likely comment on it as well.

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I looked at the Sportsnet article and a commenter on the page and he wanted to say, referring to the CFL as a “tier 3 league” and whatever, but this idiot doesn’t understand collective bargaining agreements and employment issues regardless of how one view pro leagues.
The CFL is a professional football league with player contracts, legal aspects etc. even if the CFL bed doesn’t have the money of the majors. Doesn’t matter, it’s all the same “bed” regardless of amounts. This is employment law and legalities and collective bargaining within legalities. Doesn’t matter what “tier” a pro league is, it’s pro all said and done from any legal aspect.
Of course the CFL can change it’s structure somehow to not come under employment laws like the major leagues, but why would they do this and CAN they do this to their, the CFLs advantage in whatever way? NO. Your are a professional league, or you’re not one. If you are an amateur league, then my guess the legalites are very different.

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The legalities are the same (subject to any differences in US/Canadian laws) but the expectations for negotiated revenue share, degree of medical coverage, etc./etc./etc. are
I-M-O very different because of the financial realities facing each league.

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Legalities the same, exactly, just a matter of degrees. Yes sir however one wishes to view “very different” because as I say you’re a professional league or you are an amateur league. Exactly. There is no “very different” among professional organizations or businesses other than degrees of monies, people employed etc. but the exact same laws and regulations apply.
Many people in society are living on wages less than what a CFL player makes to make ends meet with a spouse not working and a kid or two. And working as such 12 months a year on such lower salary. And any court or social work org would understand this easily.
CFL players, despite not making what the majors are making, are still pampered in some respects and playing in the CFL still allows them to be a teacher, salesperson, city councillor etc. to make well over $100,000 a year. A CFL player job is not a 12 month job in the truest sense of the word but it is still a professional job, you are being paid to play football at a decent level and can do whatever you want job wise when the CFL season is “over:”
What I’m saying simply makes total sense, at least to me, whether one wishes to agree with me or otherwise.

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Agreed. The financial differences between leagues are vast and as a result this partnership benefits the CFLPA all the more.

The CFLPA and it’s current executive team has been on a roll. They finally gained some significant ground during the last round of negotiations with the league after successive previous executives caved each time and not only gained crumbs but in some instances lost ground. Definitely looking up for them for the future

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Let’s hope it’s worth it to the CFLPA and it’s membership with the extra costs they will incur as a result of this move. Why it took so long if it is actually the case that the CFLPA needs this alliance more than the NFLPA as you mention, who knows.

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