CFL kicker Mike Vanderjagt reportedly attacked a child.

Former NFL and CFL kicker Mike Vanderjagt reportedly may lose his job as a part-time middle school football coach after attacking a child. According to the Toronto Sun.....

[url=http://www.torontosun.com/2012/05/25/vanderjagt-may-lose-job-over-alleged-attack]http://www.torontosun.com/2012/05/25/va ... ged-attack[/url]

Attacking a child, yeah right, more likely talking to spoiled teenager. I have to say, I'm incredibly skeptical as to story of these teenagers.

You mean to tell me that if a principal is in the vicinity and there is a collaborating student witness that said student thought it was better to not yell out that Vanderjagt is choking him and leave some fairly distinct hand marks as a result. It's a shame that someone who is taking time out of his schedule to teach kids the game he loves is likely never going to get to do it again because of something that likely didn't happen.

Vanderjagt does have a history of reacting before he thinks. Ask Peyton Manning.

I'm not condoning what the kid might have said to tick him off or how he behaved, but Vanderjagt is an adult and needs to be more in control of his emotions.

I'm sure when things were not going well in Indianapolis for him and fans likely said or writers wrote things that were unflattering or unkind, he could have flew off the handle then too, but chose not to

What the kid might have said to him was dumb, how Vanderjagt reacted was dumb and assault. The latter is a crime.

He didn't get charged so the cops didn't think it was assault or any other type or crime...

The school has suspended him from coaching and are investigating the matter, so they're not entirely convinced of his innocence.

Kids nowadays need all the Vanderjagt's possible. Thought of teaching but didn't have what it takes to teach and I would say MV does have what it takes, tell a smart a... kid to f.. of and get a life sort of thing that his parents are too chicken sh... to say. Go Mike! :thup:

I actually lost a lot of respect for Peyton Manning when he made that "liquored up" comment about Vanderjagt. I remember seeing the Vanderjagt interview when it aired and everything he said about Manning and Dungy was true at the time. Manning was able to paint Vanderjagt as a malcontent and jerk because of his larger platform, but Vanderjagt was spot on in his assessment at the time.

All the kid said was "Wide left". If the allegations are true, Vanderjagt needs to attend some anger management classes.

This is about the kid. Maybe he'll learn a bit of etiquette may get him more in life by knowing when to keep his yap shut. Sure, if this is the case as you say, Vanderjagt might need an anger class or two but he has his millions, the kid doesn't yet.

Did you read the article? Vaderjagt says the group of students had been taunting him with the "wide left" jeer for months. According to the Sporting News, Vanderjagt said he had apologized to the parents of the kid and the kid had apologized to him. Do you think if the parents throught he had grabbed their kid by the neck they wouldn't have pushed this hard with the police and be critisizing the DA for not pressing charges?

And those kids can't even taunt correctly since, as the article says, the FG he missed was wide right.

I said if the allegations are true. Now, it's appears that they aren't quite accurate. I was trying to say that any sort of verbal taunting doesn't warrant a grown man grabbing a kid by the neck.

Blogskee wee wee wrote:

"I actually lost a lot of respect for Peyton Manning when he made that "liquored up" comment about Vanderjagt. I remember seeing the Vanderjagt interview when it aired and everything he said about Manning and Dungy was true at the time. Manning was able to paint Vanderjagt as a malcontent and jerk because of his larger platform, but Vanderjagt was spot on in his assessment at the time."

Unfortunately, that was not the only time that Vanderjagt's behaviour was a problem...from Wikipedia...

"After the Colts routed the Denver Broncos in the wild-card round of the 2004 playoffs, he told reporters that the Colts' opponents in the next round of the playoffs, the Patriots, were "ripe for the picking," and said "I think they're not as good as the beginning of the year and not as good as last year" (when they won the Super Bowl). Patriots safety Rodney Harrison fired back at him in an interview, calling him "Vanderjerk". Harrison's teammate, linebacker Willie McGinest, was more temperate in his response, but noted that "there's going to be a whole bunch of plays when he's not going to be out there [on the field]. The rest of his guys will be out there dealing with it." The Patriots eventually defeated the Colts 20-3 and went on to win Super Bowl XXXIX."

and...

"In the 2005 NFL Playoffs, against the Pittsburgh Steelers, Vanderjagt missed a 46-yard field goal attempt wide right with 18 seconds remaining, when the Colts were behind 21-18, costing the Colts a chance at overtime and ending the team's season. Walking off the field after the kick, he took off his helmet and threw it to the ground in anger (which cost his team a 15 yard unsportsmanlike conduct penalty). It was Vanderjagt's first field goal miss in the RCA Dome in the postseason."

and...

"Shortly thereafter, on January 19, 2006, Vanderjagt appeared on a lighthearted segment of the Late Show with David Letterman, during which he successfully kicked a 46-yard field goal, outside Letterman's Manhattan studio. Letterman—an Indiana native and Colts fan—served as the holder. The appearance was said to be one of the reasons that Vanderjagt was not re-signed in 2007."

I agree with this post. Former football players can and do make excellent educators. They typically instill discipline, decorum, manners and respect ...especially to the boys. Up at Mount Hope Public School, my kids were lucky to have Toronto Argonaut Paul Masotti, as their teacher as he had the same tough rules that I had whenI was in school (Jurassic Park Public School :wink: ) Paul was tough as nails on the boys but well intentioned, fair but firm. Yeah, there was always someone in the community compalining about him, but most of us parents backed him up 100 % on his methods of handling any trouble-making, dis-respectful mouthy punks.

I suspect Vanderjagt's version of events is the correct one.

Happy Training Camp All !

Cheers!

~DH~

I don't care what the kid did or said, as an adult, Vanderjagt does not have the right to lay his hands on ANYONE, let alone someone else's child. He's not even a hire of the school board, but a volunteer.

Both my children were victims of bullying, and as such, I have an issue with those who seem to think that this kind of aggressive behaviour is the proper way of teaching ANYTHING.

Our daughter had such a no nonsense, tough, disciplinarian, in her kindigarten class to the point where she shouted and hollered at every student for whatever reason. It got to the point where our 5 year old was afraid of the teacher, would not want to approach her and even did not want to be in that class.

The next year our daughter had a teacher who was the complete opposite and we were around the school quite often for parent visits and picking her up at the end of the day. Never once heard this teacher raise her voice or show any sign of anger or aggression, yet she always had complete control of the room.

You may think of this fool as a hero. I would not want him ANYWHERE near my children.

Not sure what your getting at with any of these quotes.
None of them show that he has anger or behavior issues :?

Throwing your helmet "in anger" and costing your team a 15 yard penalty in a playoff game...demonstates selfish and undisciplined behaviour....as does running your mouth and providing bulletin board material for your playoff opponent ...especially when you won't have to answer for it or "deal with it" on the field....

And, yes, calling out your starting quarterback and head coach publicly.....

He doesn't seem to make for a good teammate.

I would say from this that he has behaviour issues...and needs to grow up...and he wants to school to young people????

Kickers are liked best when they consistently make their kicks, and NEVER EVER say a word,

Take Jason Hanson of the Detroit Lions, he's kicked in the NFL since 1992, played on some of the worst teams in NFL history and has never publicly spewed a negative comment about his Lions. He is a well liked and respected kicker because he knows that a kicker is better off shutting the hell up and doing their job when poop is spraying from your team all across the field....

I wonder why Vanderjagt isn't playing pro football any more??? :?

I completely respect him as a kicker, but he just didn't know when to shut the hell up, or ignore some disobedient and disrespectful pukes.....

Except the game was essentially over. The Colts could not have gotten the ball back after the kick was missed. There was not enough time on the clock nor did they have enough timeouts to stop the Steelers from simply taking knees. The penalty was essentially meaningless. Besides, he's far from the only player to react like that in anger.

Plaxico Burress said pretty much the same thing as Vanderjagt did when the Giants played the undefeated Pats in the Super Bowl four years ago. Burress said the Giants would win 23-17 or 24-17 (I can't remember) and when Tom Brady was asked at his press conference about it, he laughed and said, "We're only going to score 17?" No one said a thing because the Giants won. Had the Colts won, no one would have made any deal out of what Vanderjagt said. Perhaps if the offense could have scored more than three points, Vanderjagt would look like genius instead of being labeled as a bad teammate.

His attitude only became a problem when he couldn't make kicks. This isn't the same as someone running themselves out of town. He wasn't ditched because he was a bad teammate, it was because he could no longer kick.

Blogskee wee wee wrote:

"Plaxico Burress said pretty much the same thing as Vanderjagt did when the Giants played the undefeated Pats in the Super Bowl four years ago. Burress said the Giants would win 23-17 or 24-17 (I can't remember) and when Tom Brady was asked at his press conference about it, he laughed and said, "We're only going to score 17?" No one said a thing because the Giants won. Had the Colts won, no one would have made any deal out of what Vanderjagt said. Perhaps if the offense could have scored more than three points, Vanderjagt would look like genius instead of being labeled as a bad teammate."

Yes, but Burress would be on the field to deal with the fallout with what he said, unlike Vanderjagt, who likely didn't even get his uniform soiled.

"His attitude only became a problem when he couldn't make kicks. This isn't the same as someone running themselves out of town. He wasn't ditched because he was a bad teammate, it was because he could no longer kick."

In what I wrote above, I only suggested that he was a bad teammate and has behaviour issues, not that he was released for that reason. I agree, teams will put with a lot if they think you can help them win. Michael Vick and Ben Roethlisberger are examples that come to mind.

Found this item in the Bleacher Report....they see it differently....

[b]After a playoff loss in 2003, Vanderjagt ripped coach Tony Dungy and quarterback Peyton Manning. He claimed that Dungy was too mellow and questioned Manning's leadership. Funny thing is that Manning gave it right back to the kicker, calling him an "idiot" who got "liquored up and ran his mouth."

So the kicker butted heads with his own coach and quarterback. Publicly criticizing his organization was embarrassing and showed Colts fans the "idiot" he really was.

Then came the infamous 2005 playoff game against the Steelers. Now, we are all human, so while Vanderjagt's kick never came close, Colts fans should have sympathized with him. But like a child, Vanderjagt slammed his helmet into the ground and picked up a 15-yard penalty. Though the penalty had no impact on the game, the lack of composure and professionalism did not represent the Colts in a good manner. And after that incident, it's fair to complain. Come on, NFL's most accurate kicker, you're in a dome!

Strike two.

Well apparently, Vanderjagt wasn't too upset about the kick. Four days later, he attempted and converted a 46-yard field goal on The Late Show with David Letterman. How he could miss the kick and go on Letterman four days later to have fun was mind-boggling. A public appearance, an easygoing and content one nonetheless, was the last Indy would see of him.

Strike three.

The Colts went out and got the respectful and clutch kicker with a "V" last name. Adam Vinatieri. And he appeared in two Super Bowls and won a ring with the team.

So go back to 2012. It's just hilarious that Vanderjagt hasn't matured. Don't pitty Vanderjagt for his missed kick. Scott Norwood missed an even more crucial one for the Buffalo Bills in the Super Bowl, but conducted himself like a pro.

How low must a man go to choke or strangle a middle schooler for taunting him? He could have shown the boy how he is a top-five most accurate kicker of all-time. And Vanderjagt can't deal with criticism? At least his coach and quarterback, two likely Hall of Famers, never called him out.

So Colts fans, enjoy Vanderjagt getting a taste of his own medicine. He is a classless man who never won a thing in Indy.

And I think his 2012 choke might be a tad more controversial than the '05 one.
[/b]

Here's the link if you wish to read the entire piece...

[url=http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1197807-indianapolis-colts-the-saga-of-kicker-mike-vanderjagt]http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1197 ... vanderjagt[/url]

If I were Vanderjagt, I'd be peeved too. He was actually wide right on the kick in question. Every special teams buff knows Scott Norwood is forever known as Mr. Wide Right, but I digress. LOL

Oski Wee Wee,

Russ