CFL Enters into Partnership with GFL in Germany

Next part of CFL 2.0 now official.

National Combine expected to ne held in March.

GFL is 32 teams in 2 tiers of 16 with promotion/relegation. Each league consists of 8 teams per division (North/South).

It’s on their facebook page too.

(Currently trying to inform Germans about our great league with the help of facebook’s universal translator).

Nein!

Would it be too big of a dream to ask for a translator for this forum to welcome our potential new fan bases? 8)

The extent of my German extends only to the word “schnell, schnell!” from watching war movies. And they’ve probably have to say it a few times to get me to understand even that.

My German is mostly limited to “HOOOOOGAAAAAAAN.”

When the inaugural 3-down World Cup of Gridiron Football is played in Frankfurt in 2024 this will all make perfect sense.

You said this on reddit. No double dipping allowed!

I always wondered if you’d get in trouble for re-using sentences of a previous essay of your own in a new university essay. I think it’s still considered plagiarism?

As long as you don’t footnote yourself.

Springboarding to a 3 down world cup?

Well cosidering the GFL was once called the ‘American’-Football-Bundesliga, by changing the name, they’re already ahead of the curve.

This is just me of course, but I would gravitate more towards a “Canada” cup than a world one.

Great! More high school calibre players available for the CFL. ::slight_smile:

Represent an upgrade to the Als’ roster, wouldn’t you say? :smiley:

I am puzzled over the cynicism over these partnerships.

Surely people aren’t expecting an immediate payoff. it’s more like a 10-15 year pay-off. No?

Whats wrong with the CFL looking for a more global reach?

I am trying to understand the ultimate goal of this whole exercise.

I have no idea how many individuals of Mexican or German background there are in Montreal, but are any of them going to buy tickets to an Als game should one of theirs happen to make the team as a special teamer? The same I`m sure applies to other CFL cities.

What are the chances of the CFL getting a lucrative TV contract in one of these soccer centric countries?

The other thing you hear is sending players to these countries to develop after they finish college and can`t quite make the CFL. They would be better off taking jobs in the real world.

And should any elite players happen to develop in Mexico or Germany they would head to the NFL just as our elite CIS players are doing.

So to me the whole thing is a red herring to divert attention away from the real problems the CFL is facing.

I have no idea how many individuals of Mexican or German background there are in Montreal, but are any of them going to buy tickets to an Als game should one of theirs happen to make the team as a special teamer? The same I`m sure applies to other CFL cities.
Not very many I'd say.
What are the chances of the CFL getting a lucrative TV contract in one of these soccer centric countries?
Probably nil to non-existent.
The other thing you hear is sending players to these countries to develop after they finish college and can`t quite make the CFL. They would be better off taking jobs in the real world.
I can't see why they can't do that already. Don't they have freewill? Now if this is about turning one of these leagues into an official farm system that comes with associate costs along with the benefit of providing our players with a league to hone their skills in. The league has balked at giving money to similar leagues in the past, so I don't see them doing that.
And should any elite players happen to develop in Mexico or Germany they would head to the NFL just as our elite CIS players are doing.
I would like to hear about the situation of players in Europe. Maybe one of our supposed new fans could inform us? Do they have to hold second jobs like they do in Mexico? Do you think they would be willing to risk a career in Canada, what with the low pay and the fear of brain trauma?
So to me the whole thing is a red herring to divert attention away from the real problems the CFL is facing.
Sounds like it to me.

To me the three main issues the CFL has is video review slowing the game down, concussions and inadequate support for grassroots football. You can do both at once, but I have seen scant evidence of that. The league probably deserves a little grilling for that.

I could tell them what they need to do to fix that, but of course they probably wouldn’t listen to me :smiley:

You summed it up rather nicely.

To me, this is all about streaming revenues in the global market, with the philosophy that domestic sales increase as international demand does. There’s something to that idea. There is a potential bonanza at stake if the marketing strategy is executed correctly. I believe Ambrosie sees this, as do several of the owners, and what we’re seeing is that strategy actively taking shape as they progressively implement a well-defined plan.

After Mexico and Germany, Randy Ambrosie is next planning on meeting with representatives from leagues in France, Austria, Finland, Sweeden, Norway, and Denmark. Ultimate goal is to eventually get paid for broadcast rights in those nations. In the near future though, the CFL will almost certainly not air locally over there or receive much of anything in the way of compensation.

Nobody said the goal would be easily obtainable, but is it even reasonable considering that these partnered leagues are not that popular in their home countries? CFL will unlikely to ever receive significant broadcast rights from all 8 of those countries. Maybe they will be happy with at least one paying something.

For this initiative to have a chance, the CFL and the Players Association will have to figure out a way to incorporate Global players into the roster somehow. Doubt the spot would be guaranteed and certainly not one for each country. I am biased and like my idea of allowing teams to dress a 45th and 46th player but only if they are either a Canadian QB or a Global player.

The initiative is harmless, other than an additional expense on the league. As for your assessment on chances of success I agree. It is similar to trying to sell soccer to North Americans in the fifties.

Where it may yield some results is in attracting foreign investors in CFL franchises locally here.