Canadian Quarterbacks in the CFL

Here is a listing of Canadians who have played Quarterback in the CFL

http://cfl-scrapbook.no-ip.org/CFL-CanadianQB.php

Wow now I know Russ Jackson was the greatest CFL Canadian quarterback of all time I guess.

The article is sorely wrong on Jesse "Pretty Boy" Palmer. He is NOT a respected analyst down here by any honest and hard-core football fan short of Florida Gator homers and ESPN corporate water boys. Brock Berlin on ESPN is better for that matter.

Palmer's a total douchebag before and after the end of his career. How I wish Canada could nominate someone better to replace him down here as part of that Don Cherry trade we are still negotiating in that other thread and waiting for an appropriate exchange for our Erin Andrews along with the other fine Canadiana we request.

Before there was pretty boy Adam Schefter on ESPN stolen from the NFL network, there was Palmer. And now we have to hear his worthless play-by-play commentary another year especially on Thursday nights.

Palmer's a player who should have made something of himself in the CFL if that were even possible before he tried things out there, for he never was material for the requirements of the QB position in the NFL. :thdn:

I believe Eric Guthrie "The Canadian Rifle" was the last non-import starter in the CFL. But his 46.4% career completion ratio might have soured the water a bit for Canuck pivots.

Undoubtedly the best was Russ Jackson, whose stats compare favorably with the consensus "Best Player" in CFL history, Doug Flutie (as voted by the fans). Let's compare their stats:

Passing:
Name---Yrs-Att--Comp--Yds----%----Avg--TD-TD%-Int-Int%
Jackson-12-2530-1356-27492-53.6-20.2-185-7.3-125-4.9
Flutie----8--4854-2975-41355-61.3-13.9-270-5.5-155-3.1

Rushing:
Name---Yrs-Att--Yds-Avg-Td
Jackson-12-738-5045-6.8-54
Flutie----8--704-4660-6.6-66

The obvious difference was Jackson's 53.6% completion ratio compared to Flutie's 61.3%. But Jackson averaged an amazing 20.2 yds per completion, far overshadowing Flutie's 13.9 yds per pass. Jackson passed for 7.3 TD's per 100 pass attempts, while Flutie passed for 5.5 TD's per 100 attempts. Flutie threw fewer Int's per attempt, but was throwing far shorter passes on average.

Their rushing stats are very similar and both were amazing scramblers. :thup:

Excellent analysis again Xvys! :thup: This sort of hard evidence is what you call kickin' major --- on either side of the border! :slight_smile:

And gosh consider that the game back then in the 1960s as I understand was even more on natural grass and running-oriented, with receivers not as fast as today either and no indoor stadia at all, such that Jackson must have had an incredibly strong arm for that sort of absolutely incredible average per completion. Also those mostly inferior past conditions would explain at least in part some of the differential in completion percentage.

Although such a stat as yards per completion can be misleading for any given game due to some combination of poor defence or heavy freakish prowess on the part of the receiver, it is telling over the long-term because the stat comes down not only to completion of passes but also the quarterback placing the ball so accurately as to allow the receiver to rack up the yards after contact. Note that yards after catch are too easy of a stat any more mind you in the modern game, as today's game demands more physical play from the receiver than ever also in the CFL though not nearly as much in my opinion compared to the average NFL receiver usually any more at 6-0 200 with everyone down here looking for the next Michael Irvin or Terrell Owens larger prototype. I'm sure I'll get some different views on that point as well, but that's just how I see it now.

I agree, Paolo X, NFL receivers are much more physical than in the CFL, they have to fight through a block at the LOS and often wrestle the ball away from a defender in tight coverage. It really helps if you're 6' 3" 220 lbs or more. While the prototypical CFL receiver is more like 6" 1" 200 lbs, much smaller receivers can still be effective. With the increased speed of defenders and the use of defensive specialists in the CFL, it is also becoming more physical. But our huge field and unlimited motion will always favour receivers with speed and moves, rather than size and strength.

While Russ Jackson had a very strong arm, I would say plenty of his passing yardage were "yards after catch." In the era Jackson played, Rough Rider coach Frank Clair ran an offence which used only 1 receiver, Whit Tucker. With Tucker's blazing speed they only needed 1 receiver. Their setup used twin TE's, twin HB's, a FB, a QB and Tucker at Flanker. With much misdirection, defences had no idea who would run the ball and everyone was kept in to block except Tucker. They ran the ball so much and so effectively, that Tucker was often wide open, or would get open with his tremendous speed, often hoofing it to the end zone after the catch. So this can account for some of Jackson's record setting passing stats.

Flutie was more of a precision passer who would spread the ball around to six receivers in the famous "six-pack"...a completely different game from Jackson's day. Flutie passed or rushed for 336 touchdowns in 8 seasons, not including playoffs and Grey cup games.

Here is a clip of Jackson and Tucker in a typical play:

[url=http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=SableKhan#p/u/10/nvCMs9wy3b4]http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=Sab ... vCMs9wy3b4[/url]
I agree, Paolo X, NFL receivers are much more physical than in the CFL, they have to fight through a block at the LOS and often wrestle the ball away from a defender in tight coverage. It really helps if you're 6' 3" 220 lbs or more. While the prototypical CFL receiver is more like 6" 1" 200 lbs, much smaller receivers can still be effective. With the increased speed of defenders and the use of defensive specialists in the CFL, it is also becoming more physical. But our huge field and unlimited motion will always favour receivers with speed and moves, rather than size and strength.
Amazing also that Russ Jackson did that with largely one receiver wow! I see what you mean with the defence duped back then too.

Xvys and others curious actually at least 6-0 200 with 4.50 speed and 35" hops all with the requisite route running and hands would be fine NFL material for feature or star potential, but it is those smaller than either 6-0 OR 200 who are more numerous at the receiver position (not counting special teams down here) in the CFL it seems to me. Paris Jackson for your example would have as you indicate the body of the modern NFL prototype that teams are risking a whole lot to find as evidenced by the first round picks of D. Thomas and D. Bryant even this year. And woe to the team taking an undersized receiver in the first two rounds with the awful track record for those speedsters considering also the money such a high pick commands!

Fred Stamps, Darren Flutie, Arland Bruce III, Kerry Watkins, Geroy Simon, Milt Stegall, Ben Cahoon, Jeremaine Copeland, Maurice Mann, and Nik Lewis, are a few of your past and present solid receivers who come to mind as NFL undersized but CFL feature players or stars.

Consider in the following discussion in the link below the poor track record for such undersized players in the NFL since 1990, even though 3 of them had been or have emerged as stars, out of the 9 feature or star receivers found from 2004-2007. One of these in Wes Welker was undrafted, and now he's recovering from an awful knee injury due in part to the artificial turf and has his future with the jury out as far as a comeback to his star status.

[url=http://forums.cfl.ca/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=55051#p888073]viewtopic.php?f=5&t=55051#p888073[/url]

There have been very many “small” receivers who had great careers in the CFL. In fact, most of the top 30 receivers in the past 30 years have been 6’ or shorter. Brian Kelly was one of the best ever and I doubt he was over 160 lbs. Another great one, Terry Vaughn was only about 5’ 10", I believe.The Bombers had some great receivers, Mike Holmes, James Murphy and Milt Stegall come to mind. In BC, we had Merv Fernandez, 6’ 2" 200 lbs, who I regard as the best ever CFL receiver. He had narrow hips and could slip tackles and hits, and once he got free he could never be caught. Merv only dropped one pass in his CFL career. Some current receivers seem to drop 2 or 3 passes in every game.

While Paris Jackson is unusual for a CFL receiver at 220 lb, my belief is it’s an advantage to be slimmer as a CFL receiver. Those big 220 lb receivers seem to be injured half the season and often have shortened careers. They can’t avoid the open field hits as well and take them full on. Skinnier guys can twist their body in the air better and deflect some of the hit. In the NFL the field is smaller and receivers will take a good pounding with every reception, so size matters. Paris is not the go-to-guy with BC and doesn’t see that many balls, so he has held up fairly well although he’s missed the odd game, but not like Matt Dominquez, who was a big target and oft injured.

Geroy Simon, at 190 lbs is the best receiver in the CFL. He doesn’t have blinding speed, but is quick and has tremendous vision for the ball in flight and had perfected his craft to become the best technical receiver in football. :thup:

Add Don Narcisse to that list. Going into the Hall of Fame this year. Ended his career with the most yards and receptions I believe.
5'9" 170
* 216 games, 919 receptions, 75 touchdowns, 12,366 yards
* 8 - 1000+ yard seasons, 2 - 900+ yards seasons
* 34 - 100+ yard games
* Led CFL in receptions (123) - 1995
Reception in all 216 games

Wow, didn't realize Narcisse was that short? I knew he was skinny, but he looked 6'. Pretty amazing a guy that small could play over 200 consecutive games. :thup:

Bill Robinson - played for St. Mary's Huskies and played QB for Ottawa has been added:

http://cfl-scrapbook.no-ip.org/CFL-CanadianQB.php

Jesse Palmer never played a game with the Alouettes even when Calvillo was hurt.

What B.S. Palmer did just fine, He didnt need to play in the CFL, The Fact is in Florida he was robbed of the #1 Qb spot . Same thing in N.Y.

Whatever dude he did just fine ...in college ...and nothing in the NFL or CFL. :roll: And spare us this "he was robbed" BS about Palmer too. If Palmer were that good as you claim another NFL or CFL team would have claimed him, so perhaps you are just homering one of your boys here or just have some personal skin in the game to chime in here. He had NOTHING on the field as far as pro quarterback. :thdn:

Russ Jackson all the way until the next great Canadian QB from the excellent EVIDENCE provided by Xvys, but Palmer does not belong on that list and is the douchebag he is off the field all the same. Homer him all you want for whatever reason but you bring no hard goods to the discussion.

In fact we'll throw him in for free in that Chris Berman for Don Cherry trade now that is hung up due to no Canadian gal proposed in exchange for Erin Andrews along with the requested items of Canadiana. :stuck_out_tongue:

This story is about Canadian QB's in the CFL and Palmer shouldn't be included because he didn't play here. His claim to fame is he "traveled with the team to the Grey Cup"...but so did Gainer the Gopher and I don't see his name on the Cup?

The truth is Palmer quit on his team. He choose to give up rather than compete for a roster spot, probably because he realized he couldn't cut the mustard. Palmer wasn't good enough to be a full time starter in college. He was a embarrassing washout in the NFL who choked when his team needed him. Then he comes to Canada and gives up before attempting a pass. :roll:

Palmer did very good for a Canadian kid in american football, He was a victim of american football politics! try and re-right history all you want. Fact is he didnt need cfl! xvys your correct !tell your b.s. buddy to stay on topic :twisted:

I might have to respectfully disagree with you on this one, Xvys. IIRC, the Als' Gerry Dattilio came along a little after The Canadian Rifle and would have the distinction of being the last bona fide Canadian starter in the CFL (Giulio Caravatta started some games for the Leos, but wasn't THE starter).

Some other homegrown QBs that played for the Leos: Hank Grenda (1969) who played at Washington State, and Wayne Holm (1971-2) from Simon Fraser.

rhymes with orange wrote:
Xvys wrote: I believe Eric Guthrie "The Canadian Rifle" was the last non-import starter in the CFL. But his 46.4% career completion ratio might have soured the water a bit for Canuck pivots.
I might have to respectfully disagree with you on this one, Xvys. IIRC, the Als' Gerry Dattilio came along a little after The Canadian Rifle and would have the distinction of being the last bona fide Canadian starter in the CFL (Giulio Caravatta started some games for the Leos, but wasn't THE starter).
Right you are, rwo, thanks for the correction. I don't know how I missed Gerry Datillio who was a pretty darn good QB. :thup:

Ah well if you are going to go again as you do usually under your nationalist banner Mass like that, well was he also a victim of Canadian politics as well? I didn't hear about any other CFL team wanting Palmer.

Go on keep ranting mindlessly your propaganda without ANY evidence to support your rants and YOU try to re-write history. :roll:

Have a look at Palmer's pro stat sheet for example huh huh ...yeah it was all politics when no team wanted him sure right. :roll:

Why don't you contact him at ESPN and plead for him to come over to TSN as you are so high on him? We can't wait for him to get off our TV because HE SUCKS off the field too.

Palmer had a big head from his NFL days.. he figures that was enough to qualify him as a Starter... ya ok! :roll: