Best ever CFL quarter backs

The fact is that no matter what the question, when you try to pick an "all time" or "best ever", it is imposible to compare era's. Just as with any sport, todays athletes are bigger, faster and, stronger. Simply put, star players from the 50's, 60's, even the 80's would not be able to make the taxi squads of todays teams, so you have to take things in context and compare their domination at the time of their career.

The 50's are for me a golden era of CFL football. Not only was the game the only professional sport in the country outside of Montreal and Toronto, it was also an era that saw many of the greatest players in the US come to Canada because the CFL was paying more money the the NFL for star players. The 50's and early 60's saw many Heisman candidates head to Canada, including Heisman winner Billy Vessels, and finalists, Kenny Ploen, Joe Kapp and others.

umm..trading Calvillo would have been the greatest blunder in Als history.

There's a reason they never let him go.

[b]Here is my rating of the Greatest Passers in CFL History:

Name...................G ---- C ----- A ---- % ---- Yds --- Td --- Int - T% - I% - QR - Yd/c - GR
[/b]Dave Dickenson.......143 - 1635 - 2421 - 67.5 - 22913 - 154 -- 50 - 6.4 - 2.1 - 110 - 14.6 - 92
Warren Moon...........94 - 1369 - 2382 - 57.5 - 21228 - 144 -- 77 - 6.0 - 3.2 -- 94 - 15.5 - 76
Doug Flutie............135 - 2975 - 4854 - 61.3 - 41355 - 270 - 155 - 5.6 - 3.2 -- 94 - 13.9 - 71
Henry Burris...........167 - 2622 - 4368 - 60.0 - 37464 - 237 - 141 - 5.4 - 3.2 -- 93 - 14.2 - 66
Condredge Holloway..181 - 1710 - 3011 - 56.8 - 25193 - 155 -- 94 - 5.1 - 3.1 -- 88 - 14.7 - 66
Anthony Calvillo.......285 - 5040 - 7952 - 63.4 - 66131 - 383 - 197 - 4.8 - 2.5 -- 95 - 13.1 - 63
Tracy Ham.............215 - 2671 - 4937 - 54.1 - 40534 - 284 - 164 - 5.8 - 3.3 -- 87 - 15.1 - 62
Tom Wilkinson........175 - 1473 - 2427 - 60.7 - 20192 - 136 - 105 - 5.6 - 4.3 -- 88 - 13.7 - 60
Russ Jackson..........000 - 1356 - 2530 - 53.6 - 24592 - 185 - 125 - 7.2 - 4.9 -- 91 - 18.1 - 57
Matt Dunigan..........194 - 3057 - 5476 - 55.8 - 43859 - 306 - 211 - 5.6 - 3.9 -- 85 - 14.3 - 57
Ricky Ray..............213 - 2882 - 4301 - 67.0 - 35935 - 186 - 119 - 4.3 - 2.8 -- 96 - 12.4 - 56
Tom Clements.........182 - 2807 - 4657 - 60.3 - 39041 - 252 - 214 - 5.4 - 4.6 -- 86 - 13.9 - 54
Kevin Glenn............180 - 2127 - 3496 - 60.8 - 28522 - 160 - 111 - 4.6 - 3.2 -- 89 - 13.4 - 51
Damon Allen...........370 - 5178 - 9138 - 56.7 - 72381 - 394 - 278 - 4.3 - 3.0 -- 84 - 13.9 - 48

This is a rating of the Greatest QB's in the CFL from 1970 to 2010, who passed for over 20,000 yards. Russ Jackson (who retired in 1969) added for comparison.

Note: QR = QB Rating; GR = Greatness Rating

Ummm, Did I say anything about trading?

Damon Allen
In 1989, Allen signed with the Ottawa Rough Riders
In 1992, Allen signed with the Hamilton Tiger-Cats
In 1995, Allen signed as a free-agent with the Memphis Mad Dogs
In 1996, Allen signed with the BC Lions.

Sure he was traded back to Edmonton and to the Argos.

Doug Flutie
Signed as Free agent with Calgary
Signed as Free agent with Toronto

Nobody has any proof that Cavillo could make other teams better. For all we know it was the system that was put around him that allowed him to succed.

Nobody has any proof that Cavillo could make other teams better. For all we know it was the system that was put around him that allowed him to succed.
well we do know that over the years he helped many receivers put up big numbers in Montreal, of which many, if not all, faltered dramatically when they moved to other teams.

Again, it is very difficult to compare era's, as the game evolves. Changes to strategies and even equipment and playing surfaces make todays game more open to passing.

Another factor which is a part of any North American sport, is that football, with few exceptions was prior to the 1960's predominately a caucasion dominated endevour. The breaking of colour barriers that occured in the 50's in most sports is very previlent in football and I believe the CFL was ahead of the NFL in this regard as well. I bring this up only to suggest that the talent pool was far more resticted in early years.

Wonder how the feel about that in Hamilton.

how dare Calvillo have any loyalty

who cares if he made other teams better? he made HIS team better, that's all that's important

Sick to our stomachs. :frowning:

I don't know how you did that - some kind of mathematical formula I would guess - but Burris is way too high. As exclusively a passer, I wouldn't even say he's better than Ray.

Also I have no idea where your 66k yards for AC came from unless your numbers are from halfway through last year (as obviously he has 72k+ now). And finally the greatness of a player is usually judged more on their peak years than longevity - although both play some factor of course - but AC's early years should have no factor on how "great" he is seen as. Additionally, you gotta give GC wins some sort of value if you're talking about "greatness".

I know you have explained the "Greatness Rating" before, and it's an interesting and creative concept. But any rating that has Dave Dickenson 15% better than Doug Flutie (21/71*%) has a major flaw. Dickenson was an excellent QB, but I don't believe there is a single coach in the history of the CFL who would choose him over Flutie when both were in their prime.

Additionally, you gotta give GC wins some sort of value if you're talking about "greatness"
absolutely. Joe Montana and Terry Bradshaw did not have spectacular regular season stats, although played brilliantly in post season, winning numerous Superbowls each. And both are considered all time greats/icons due to winning the Big Games, not because of their adequate regular season play.

"Sick to our stomachs"? Not really. Yes, it sucks to see Calvillo leave and become great somewhere else. But no less than Ron Lancaster and Russ Jackson thought Calvillo would never amount to anything in Hamilton. There are so many variables that there is no way to know if Calvillo would have had the same career in Hamilton. He was expected to be the saviour in Hamilton, while in Montreal he got to sit behind and learn from Tracy Ham. His career might have taken a much different path had he stayed with the Tiger-Cats. He may have developed into what he is today, or he may have flamed out. Timing and opportunity have as much to do with a player's success as anything. He found the right situation in Montreal; it is impossible to know if that could have been replicated in Hamilton.

it is impossible to know if that could have been replicated in Hamilton.
True enough. Speculation can be the worst of all regrets. It is disappointing however, that Lancaster didn't give Calvillo time to develop as he was only 25 years old when released.

Calvillo, being the competitor he is and not impervious to perseverance, almost certainly would have improved substantially with the Tabbies, although how dramatic is up for debate.

One would think that Moon's 5 GCs in a row would kind of give him the edge in the greatness column.

Moon allways gets the credit for the five consecutive G.C,s won by Edmonton. Iwonder if he has ever acknowledged his team mates and hid tutor Wilkisnson?
All of the above could make the NFL. ,they(NFL) just don't want to make the CFL look good!

Moon allways gets the credit for the five consecutive G.C,s won by Edmonton. Iwonder if he has ever acknowledged his team mates and hid tutor Wilkisnson? All of the above could make the NFL. ,they(NFL) just don't want to make the CFL look good!
Didn't Wilkinson QB the first 2 or 3 Grey Cups of that period, and Moon the last two or three?

Either way, they were both integral parts of the greatest dynasty in pro football history.

Doug Flutie! Next topic!!!!!!!

Did you ever see Parker play?

I can say I did; As an assistant coach Parker came out of retirement at the age of 36 to help the Lions out at QB in a mid season situation.........kudos for that I say.