Austin New Head Coach at Cornell

It has been reported that Kent Austin will be officially named the new head coach at Cornell University tomorrow:

[url=http://www.cbc.ca/sports/football/story/2010/01/26/austin-cornell-football.html]http://www.cbc.ca/sports/football/story ... tball.html[/url]

is this division 3? I’ve never heard of this school

Division 1, Ivy league.

http://www.ivyleaguesports.com/whatisivy/index.asp

I think the Ivy League is what they call 1AA. They're not really Div I calibre.

But it is a surprise, I thought he wanted to go back home where his kids could grow up in the warm weather and play Mississippi football.

Bob Nicholson should have been able to fire the bunch in control of the Argos and make Austin GM and Coach. That would be the most logical thing to do, if Austin would actually come back to the CFL.
However, I believe he was fired by Cinamon for not making Ricky Williams into a 2,000 yard rusher, so Austin coming back to the Argos would be out of the question under the current regime.

With Jevon Snead and Dexter McCluster going into the NFL draft,I suspect Austin saw this as achnace to get out while the gettin' was good.I wonder if he had a problem with Houston Nutt?Having said that,an Ivy League head coaching job is not what one would call exactly "upwardly mobile".

When Joe Restic left the Cats for Harvard, one of the perqs of the head coaching job was free tuition for your kids at the university. Ivy League resumes have value beyond football. Perhaps Austin has a similar deal in Ithica. I think Ralph Scholes(sp) of the 86 Grey Cup team was a Cornell grad. :smiley:
Pat Lynch(the old guy in section 7)

I was surprised by this, but Ithaca is a nice place and it is a good school. I'm sure it will be interesting for him to return to a place where hockey is more popular than football.

red24

That classification was renamed or changed a few years ago.

Oy, is this complicated.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Division_I

[i]Division I (or D-I) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States.

D-I schools are generally the major collegiate athletic powers, with larger budgets, more elaborate facilities, and higher numbers of athletic scholarships in comparison to Division II and III. This level was once called the University Division of the NCAA in contrast to the College Division; this terminology was replaced with the current numeric (I, II, III) divisions in 1973.[1] In football only, Division I was further subdivided into Division I-A (the principal football schools) and Division I-AA in 1978;[2] these were renamed to "Football Bowl Subdivision" and "Football Championship Subdivision" in 2006.[3][4] Subsequently, the term "Division I-AAA" has been used by some to delineate Division I schools which do not field a football program at all.[5] Currently Division I contains 342 Institutions plus 7 going through the Reclassification Period. There currently is a moratorium on any additional movement up to Division I that is in effect until 2012.

All Division I schools must field athletes in at least seven sports for men and seven for women (or six for men and eight for women) with two team sports for each sex.[6] There are several other NCAA sanctioned minimums and differences that distinguish Division I from Division II and III.[6][/i]

I've attended 2 Yale/Harvard games in the past 5 years. Great fun, not very good football. Both games decided the Ivy league championship so I believe I saw the best the Ivy League has to offer. I'll go back again but I don't expect to see any future pros (most CIS grads in the CFL are as good or better than these players)