Anthony Calvillo says "Its a much faster game here"

[url=http://stream.wsj.com/story/latest-headlines/SS-2-63399/SS-2-391482/]http://stream.wsj.com/story/latest-head ... -2-391482/[/url]

The story goes on to debunk the myth of the things it mentions later in the article about american players who think its a stepping stone to the NFL with Anthony Calvillo's comments.

He says he knows many US players that can't cut it here. Like in the title he stated "its a much faster game here"

More evidence that if an NFL team were to play a CFL team all game at Canadian rules that you would see how different the games are and how much the NFL team would be unable to compete for the entirety of the game and the 20 second clocks.

Its time to spread the word people, time to end these NFL is better than CFL myths. Just because they make more money doesn't mean jack, just more people to pay them more. Again, money, never really effected anybody's talent in the last 100 years of olympics. People getting paid more from different countries would lose to people making less money. I just laugh when people think money makes talent.

CFL wins at Canadian rules, different sport, no longer should we hear at games or on TV about the NFL being better enoughs enough. its not better, its a different sport can't really be compared. The CFL players are the best at Canadian Football in the World. The Grey Cup is the WORLD Champsionship. Thats what needs to be stated more. Just like the Super Bowl is the best at American Football in the world so is the Grey Cup for Canadian Football.

The headkine is dumb
Football gaining a foothold in Canada

Makes it sound like its only been around for 3 or 4 years

Great read ... Agree with everything you said :thup: :thup:

It's a great game, and the CFL needs only the following to make it better:

  1. Expansion of game-day rosters to 46 players
  2. 10 teams
  3. A full OT period with complete football instead of the awful scrimmage ball format - the first team to 6 points or more scored on the other team in the overtime period wins; otherwise it is a tie.

Agree completely with points 2 and 3, but will never agree on roster expansion. Dressing so many specialists has resulted in a more defence-oriented product. I'd like to see game-day rosters reduced to 38 or 40, although obviously that won't happen.

Well 2 out of 3 is pretty good PW.

You are not getting more offence with fewer players though. And do you want more defence? If so, you must be friends with MadJack. :slight_smile:

We'll agree to disagree, but I am not far off part of your position on that item perhaps.

Just one key reason I would like to see 46 is for extras to support the running game at RB and at tackle so that replacement is not nearly as difficult for a team. Also who does not need an extra cover corner or extra rushing linebacker as opposed to only a safety or small linebacker for that matter?

Also 46 would be the max and optional - the same 42 as now could be dressed should a team wish to not add players.

:cowboy:

... a better analogy is the difference in Olympic hockey rinks vs. NHL sized rinks. The larger ice surface (Olympics) lends itself to a different more wide open game than the NHL dump and forecheck style that works in a smaller rink much better and lends itself to bigger checking style players. The larger surface lends itself to a more wide open game with faster skaters (smaller o.k.) and more mobile defencemen.
Compare that to the smaller NFL field both length and width which lends itself to bigger guys and a more deliberate style of offence (4 downs too) compared to smaller faster CFL players who must be able to cover a much larger field. :rockin: :cowboy:

Also, look at a guy like Martin St. Louis with Tampa, small but extremely effective. Not all small players are the same. And that's in the NHL on a small surface with the dump and chase NHL style.

My issues with expanded rosters are: 1. teams are loading up with imports on defence -- to shut down offences. Most teams use between four and six of their seven NI starters on offence. 2. It makes it easier to do situation substitution on defence, i.e. take out a tired d-lineman and replace him with someone almost as good; or put in a speedy extra cover guy on second and long; 3. It has helped take the game out of the hands of the players and put it into the hands of coaches.

In the days of 34- or 36-man rosters, we saw the same starters all game -- they had to be able to play decently in all situations, and they got tired, which led to mistakes, which led to big plays and more unpredictability.

If game rosters go to 46, we will see even more of these trends, IMO.

I disagree with Anthony on this one.The NFL has the faster and better athletes on its rosters.Most of the top CFL players are American anyways.Most couldn't make a NFL roster if they wanted too

I love the CFL but a receiver like Calvin Johnson if he had time to adjust to the waggle would absolutely crush any defensive back in the league right now.

Every so often this league gets a dominant player like Cameron Wake or Jerell Freeman but these players usually leave as soon as they can for the NFL.

Many NFL players couldn't make it in the CFL either. Several positions on CFL teams require quicker and more agile players than are used in the NFL.

Right - the core overlooked point I notice on both sides of the border is that a successful player in one league can't be just plucked into the other league given all the other variables that include the coaching, offensive and/or defensive scheme, role of the position in any such scheme, et cetera.

As we have discussed at length in other threads, only certain positions and players have the versatility to make a successful change from one league to the other.

For a successful move, both the player and position have to be a match. Usually it's only one or the other, and the resultant underwhelming performance of said player in a new system is a major reason we do not see too many successful swaps from one league to the other in a literal different game on the field.

The tight end position in the NFL is a good example of this. The bigger slower tight ends in the NFL would have a difficult time making a CFL team I think as there is no reason to have such a player on most CFL teams assuming such a player as a slower tight end in the NFL is used more for blocking than receiving.

He said the game is faster, he's correct, the size of the field, the 20 second clock and the 3 minute clock make the CFL a faster paced game no question.

I'm not sure I agree with this...

Tony Gonzalez,Jermaine Gresham,Victor Davis,Antonio Gates,Jimmy Graham,Rob Gronkowski,and,Brent Celek are slower Tight End blocking types?

These players are integral parts of their respective offences because of their multiple abilities...Namely being big enough to block and their athleticism to get open and make tough catches over the middle...

I'm of two minds on this,in terms of the CFL...The Tight End position has essentially become extinct up here (so has the Fullback position,as well) based on the theory that the field size requires faster but smaller players ie. the Slotback position and things will probably go on like this for many reasons we can get into...

But the downsizing of offensive skill players has had an equal reaction on defences in this league.Many DE positions and outside linebacker positions are taken up by smaller than usual players now.Most outside LB's are basically blown up DB's or Safety's...I'm wondering now if a team decided to go with a big O-Line and play out of a Double TE Set with a Fullback and a Halfback on 60 to 70% of the potential plays run wouldn't be a bad idea?

This game is about matchups and physical mismatches are always good in this sport...

Look at Maybin... He hasn't shown he has the motor to deal with the CFL. We need different attributes in our game. These big tight ends are great on a small crowded field but they would not be as effective in our game, the closest you could compare is Nick Lewis and Huff uses him sparingly when he needs to convert on second down. Kind of like comparing sprinters to long distance runners.