Onemoredork

Professional football has been turning Olympic athletes into players since Jim Thorpe in 1912.

With varying degrees of success it is clear in many cases football skills can be taught and such athletes raising skills to the necessary levels is a distinct possibility.
Jim thorpe was already an established football star before he competed at the 1912 Olympics.
If being an amateur on an obscure trade school team counts as a star, yes.

blackandgld

Jim Thorpe is an awesome story. A Native American, Olympic Decathlon champ, MLB and NFL and Lacrosse player. He also won intercollegiate ballroom dancing championship.
He led a little known Carlisle University to a victory against a top ranked Harvard scoring all his teams points a TD and 4-FGs as he was a RB, DB, P/K.
One of my all time favorite stories of an amazing athlete.

EastVanMark

Professional football has been turning Olympic athletes into players since Jim Thorpe in 1912.

With varying degrees of success it is clear in many cases football skills can be taught and such athletes raising skills to the necessary levels is a distinct possibility.
Jim thorpe was already an established football star before he competed at the 1912 Olympics.
If being an amateur on an obscure trade school team counts as a star, yes.
He was an All-American football star playing on an "obscure" trade school that just happened to win that eras version of the national championship so ya, it most definitely counts.

So again, he was already a football player (and a great one at that) before he took part in the Olympics.

Onemoredork

Professional football has been turning Olympic athletes into players since Jim Thorpe in 1912.

With varying degrees of success it is clear in many cases football skills can be taught and such athletes raising skills to the necessary levels is a distinct possibility.
Jim thorpe was already an established football star before he competed at the 1912 Olympics.
If being an amateur on an obscure trade school team counts as a star, yes.
He was an All-American football star playing on an "obscure" trade school that just happened to win that eras version of the national championship so ya, it most definitely counts.

So again, he was already a football player (and a great one at that) before he took part in the Olympics.
Thanks,
So again... point being.... olympic athletes have been turned into professional level football players for a very long time.

letsgoticats

Professional football has been turning Olympic athletes into players since Jim Thorpe in 1912.

With varying degrees of success it is clear in many cases football skills can be taught and such athletes raising skills to the necessary levels is a distinct possibility.
Jim thorpe was already an established football star before he competed at the 1912 Olympics.
If being an amateur on an obscure trade school team counts as a star, yes.
He was an All-American football star playing on an "obscure" trade school that just happened to win that eras version of the national championship so ya, it most definitely counts.

So again, he was already a football player (and a great one at that) before he took part in the Olympics.
Thanks,
So again... point being.... olympic athletes have been turned into professional level football players for a very long time.
I guess you're technically correct, in that Thorpe was an Olympian before he became a professional football player.  But he was a super-star college player before he was an Olympian.

Are there any examples of Olympians who went on to have successful football careers despite never having played college football (NCAA DI/DII/DIII, CIS).  That's the situation Akeem Haynes is in right now.  

EastVanMark

Professional football has been turning Olympic athletes into players since Jim Thorpe in 1912.

With varying degrees of success it is clear in many cases football skills can be taught and such athletes raising skills to the necessary levels is a distinct possibility.
Jim thorpe was already an established football star before he competed at the 1912 Olympics.
If being an amateur on an obscure trade school team counts as a star, yes.
He was an All-American football star playing on an "obscure" trade school that just happened to win that eras version of the national championship so ya, it most definitely counts.

So again, he was already a football player (and a great one at that) before he took part in the Olympics.
Thanks,
So again... point being.... olympic athletes have been turned into professional level football players for a very long time.
I guess you're technically correct, in that Thorpe was an Olympian before he became a professional football player.  But he was a super-star college player before he was an Olympian.

Are there any examples of Olympians who went on to have successful football careers despite never having played college football (NCAA DI/DII/DIII, CIS).  That's the situation Akeem Haynes is in right now.  
Exactly.

Akeem Haynes is an olympic athlete who is becoming a football player.
Thorpe already was one before.

catfish

Professional football has been turning Olympic athletes into players since Jim Thorpe in 1912.

With varying degrees of success it is clear in many cases football skills can be taught and such athletes raising skills to the necessary levels is a distinct possibility.
Jim thorpe was already an established football star before he competed at the 1912 Olympics.
If being an amateur on an obscure trade school team counts as a star, yes.
He was an All-American football star playing on an "obscure" trade school that just happened to win that eras version of the national championship so ya, it most definitely counts.

So again, he was already a football player (and a great one at that) before he took part in the Olympics.
Thanks,
So again... point being.... olympic athletes have been turned into professional level football players for a very long time.
I guess you're technically correct, in that Thorpe was an Olympian before he became a professional football player.  But he was a super-star college player before he was an Olympian.

Are there any examples of Olympians who went on to have successful football careers despite never having played college football (NCAA DI/DII/DIII, CIS).  That's the situation Akeem Haynes is in right now.  
Exactly.

Akeem Haynes is an olympic athlete who is becoming a football player.
Thorpe already was one before.
Haynes's Hands may be a concern.

Slomojo2005

Professional football has been turning Olympic athletes into players since Jim Thorpe in 1912.

With varying degrees of success it is clear in many cases football skills can be taught and such athletes raising skills to the necessary levels is a distinct possibility.
Jim thorpe was already an established football star before he competed at the 1912 Olympics.
If being an amateur on an obscure trade school team counts as a star, yes.
He was an All-American football star playing on an "obscure" trade school that just happened to win that eras version of the national championship so ya, it most definitely counts.

So again, he was already a football player (and a great one at that) before he took part in the Olympics.
Thanks,
So again... point being.... olympic athletes have been turned into professional level football players for a very long time.
I guess you're technically correct, in that Thorpe was an Olympian before he became a professional football player.  But he was a super-star college player before he was an Olympian.

Are there any examples of Olympians who went on to have successful football careers despite never having played college football (NCAA DI/DII/DIII, CIS).  That's the situation Akeem Haynes is in right now.  
Exactly.

Akeem Haynes is an olympic athlete who is becoming a football player.
Thorpe already was one before.
Haynes's Hands may be a concern.
Hands a concern?  Why?  He has not dropped a baton during relay races!!!!!      Just kidding, yes his ability to catch is questionable as is his ability to run routes/ adjust to defenses etc.  All the stuff that good receivers need to have are somewhat questionable.  Hoping for a success story here.

Mark

Tommie Smith (of the 1968 black power salute along with John Carlos who got the bronze) played in High School but not college. The Bengals appreciated his skills for 2 whole games and 1 reception for 41 yards in 1969.  Carlos played in 9 games for theALs with only 5 receptions.




However, Bob Hayes & Willie Gault both played in college but these 2 NFL hall of fame speedsters would be near the top of the Olympian/Footballer parade.
 


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